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Undergraduate Admissions Information
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Madonna University
36600 Schoolcraft Road
Livonia, Michigan 48150-1176
(734) 432-5339 or (800) 852-4951, ext. 5339
Fax (734) 432-5424
Email: admissions@madonna.edu

Social Work Major: Bach Soc Work | Social Work Major - Support: Bach Soc Work
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Social Work Major: Bach Soc Work    
   Major Courses (47 cr. to be chosen)    
      SW  2290   Tools for Success in Social Work and Sociology (SOC/SW*) 1 cr.  For social work and sociology majors or individuals considering either major. Introduces American Psychological Association (APA) writing style, forms of professional writing required in social work generalist practice, elements of effective oral communication, library research and technology skills, resources available for success in the Social Work or Sociology Programs. Includes University-required Writing Assessment for students needing to complete this requirement. Prerequisite or corequisite (for social work majors only): SW 2300. Prerequisite or corequisite (for sociology majors only): SOC 2020. Course is graded as a S/F. 
      SW  2300   Introduction to Social Work 4 cr.  Introduces the profession of Social Work, the roles of the generalist social work practitioner, and the profession’s Code of Ethics. Emphasizes client systems from a strengths perspective and the positive value of diversity and difference. Explores the profession’s historical development, commitment to human rights and social and economic justice, current trends, and acquaints students with fields of practice. Stresses self-assessment and critical thinking skills to determine suitability for a career in social work. Includes a 30-hour academic service-learning experience. Prerequisite or corequisite (for social work majors only): SW 2290. 
      SW  3400   Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3 cr.  First of two courses examining biological, social, cultural, psychological, spiritual perspectives of human behavior, emphasizing interaction of these dimensions as they impact social functioning within the ecological systems framework. Introduces concepts of context and environment, diversity and difference, oppression, poverty, marginalization and alienation, privilege and power, as they shape human experience and identity. Includes reflection on developmental influences affecting student’s own values, world view, and professional development. Prerequisites: BIO 1010 or BIO 2250; SOC 1020. 
      SW  3410   Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 cr.  Second of two courses examining dimensions of human behavior and the social environment. Builds upon theories and approaches presented in SW 3400: HBSE I, with a focus on human behavior development across the life course and the social system’s role in promoting or deterring health and well-being. Further explores intersection of diversity and difference, social justice and oppression as relates to a person’s life experiences. Stresses positive value of human diversity in social work practice. Prerequisite: SW 3400; prerequisite or corequisite: PSY 1010 and SW 2300. 
      SW  3450   Practice Methods I: Individuals 3 cr.  First in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Orients to the application of engagement, assessment, evidence-based intervention, and evaluation with individuals. Focuses on diversity, difference, and the utilization of knowledge, skills and values in social work with individuals. Prerequisites or co-requisites: SW 2300 & SW 3400. 
      SW  3700   Practice Methods II: Groups and Families 4 cr.  Second in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Applies knowledge, skills, and values in working with families and groups. Interprets human behavior within the context of a family’s or group’s culture, ethnicity, worldview, strengths, developmental stages, and challenges within a systems theory framework. Develops practice skills and methods for engaging, assessing, intervening, and evaluating with families and groups. Includes a 30-hour academic service-learning experience. Prerequisite: SW 3400 with a grade of C (2.0) or better. 
      SW  3960   Social Research Methods (SOC/SW*) 4 cr.  Prepares students to become educated consumers of evidence-based social work and social science research to inform and improve practice, policy, and social service delivery. Orients to scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge through the use of quantitative and qualitative research processes. Emphasizes importance of understanding ethical considerations when conducting research with human subjects. Prerequisites: CIS 2380; SW 2300 (for social work majors only), SOC 2020 (for sociology majors only). 
      SW  4260   Social Welfare History and Policy 4 cr.  Explores the profession’s social welfare system from a philosophical and historical basis and examines the characteristics of contemporary social welfare policy in the United States. Critically analyzes major social policies and identifies how international, federal, state, local, and agency-based policy influences social work practice and delivery. Examines strategies for changing policy with particular emphasis on social justice, human rights, and vulnerable populations. The course includes a mandatory policy-focused field day. Prerequisites: PSC 1510 and admission to the Social Work Program. 
      SW  4350   Practice Methods III: Organizations 3 cr.  Third in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Analyzes organizational characteristics and behaviors in preparation for advancing effective service delivery. Develops practice skills and methods for engaging, assessing, and intervening in organizations and agencies, including resource development and program evaluation. Focuses on effective, ethical, and professional practice within human service agencies and organizations. Prerequisites: SW 3410, SW 3700, and admission to the Social Work Program. 
      SW  4700   Practice Methods IV: Communities (SOC/SW*) 3 cr.  Fourth in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Examines perspectives and structures of community, focusing on oppression, discrimination, poverty, marginalization, alienation, factors of diversity and difference as well as sources of privilege and power as they impact social wellbeing. Emphasizes the application of planned change processes at the community level in response to changing contexts and needs to promote social and economic justice, and to advance the equitable distribution of basic human rights and resources. Prerequisite: SW 4350 for Social Work Students or SOC 1020 for all other students. 
      SW  4750   Senior Integrative Capstone 3 cr.  Using critical thinking to integrate social work knowledge, skills, theory, evidence, and values relating to person-in-environment. The course builds upon all previous courses and field internships in the curriculum, using a multi-level analysis and reflection process on professional self and population of engagement. Taken concurrently with the second semester of field placement. Corequisites: SW 4900 and SW 4950. 
      SW  4800   Field Practicum I 4 cr.  Field education component involving 200 clock hours per term of direct service taken concurrently with Field Seminar (SW 4850). This is the "signature pedagogy" of social work education. Working under social work supervision, students apply the knowledge, skills, and values of generalist social work practice with client systems of all sizes. Refining of skills to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate within the profession’s values and ethics. Provision of a structured learning opportunity to integrate theory and practice in the role of social work practitioner. Prerequisites: all junior-level social work courses. Prerequisites or corequisites: SW 4260, SW 4350; corequisite: SW 4850. Formal admission to Field Practicum is required. 
      SW  4850   Field Practicum Seminar I 2 cr.  Integrative seminar taken concurrently with Field Practicum I (SW 4800). Students reflect upon experiences and challenges of field practicum. Focus is on evaluating and supporting the integration and application of knowledge, skills, and values of generalist social work practice from course work to field. Students demonstrate the professional use of self, self-awareness, and appreciation for diversity and difference. Agency data, reports, and forms are reviewed to further develop skills in research and in program and practice evaluation strategies. Prerequisites: all junior-level social work courses. Prerequisites or corequisites: SW 4260, SW 4350; corequisite: SW 4800. 
      SW  4900   Field Practicum II 4 cr.  Field education component involving 200 clock hours per term of direct service taken concurrently with Field Seminar (SW 4950). This is the "signature pedagogy" of social work education. Working under social work supervision, students apply the knowledge, skills, and values of generalist social work practice with client systems of all sizes. Refining of skills to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate within the profession’s values and ethics. Provision of a structured learning opportunity to integrate theory and practice in the role of social work practitioner. Prerequisites: all junior-level social work courses. Prerequisites or corequisites: SW 4700, SW 4750; corequisite: SW 4950. Formal admission to Field Practicum is required. 
      SW  4950   Field Practicum Seminar II 2 cr.  Integrative seminar taken concurrently with Field Practicum II (SW 4900). Students reflect upon experiences and challenges of field practicum. Focus is on evaluating and supporting the integration and application of knowledge, skills, and values of generalist social work practice from course work to field. Students demonstrate the professional use of self, self-awareness, and appreciation for diversity and difference. Agency data, reports, and forms are reviewed to further develop skills in research and in program and practice evaluation strategies. Prerequisites: all junior-level social work courses. Prerequisites or corequisites: SW 4700, SW 4750; corequisite: SW 4900. 
Social Work Major - Support: Bach Soc Work    
   Support Courses (14 cr. to be chosen)    
      BIO 1010/2250 Option (3 cr. to be chosen)    
         BIO 1010   Introductory Biology 4 cr.  A course for non-science majors, presenting biological concepts influencing individual decisions affecting community structure and the state of the world. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. 
         BIO 2250   Basic Human Physiology 3 cr.  Non-laboratory study of the functioning of the body systems considering the integration and control of life processes in the cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Not applicable to Biology major but may be applied to Biology minor. 
      PSC 1510   American Government 3 cr.  American political structure to include the organization, powers, functions and services of national, state and local government and their interdependence in seeking solutions to contemporary social, economic, and political issues. 
      PSY 1010   General Psychology 3 cr.  The science of behavior and mental processes: sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, emotion, personality development, adjustment, and maladjustment. 
      SOC 1020   Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.  Foundations and principles of social order, social control, social institutions, and social life in America and other cultures. Focus on how people’s conditions, character, and life chances are influenced by organizations and institutions. Emphasis on critical thinking about practices and beliefs in a variety of social contexts. 
      SOC 2140   Conflict Resolution (EDU/SOC*/SW) 1 cr.  Introduces students to 21st century non-violent conflict resolution skills and knowledge. The class addresses non-violence, attitudes towards conflict, conflict styles, macro and micro levels of conflict processes, diversity, and methods of conflict resolution. The focus is interpersonal conflict resolution in the home and work. 
      SW  2160   Empathy Listening Skills (SOC/SW*) 1 cr.  Instruction and practice in the establishment of rapport with individuals through the use of empathic listening skills. The material is presented in the context of developing a helping relationship. 
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