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Undergraduate Admissions Information
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Madonna University
36600 Schoolcraft Road
Livonia, Michigan 48150-1176
(734) 432-5339 or (800) 852-4951, ext. 5339
Fax (734) 432-5424
Email: admissions@madonna.edu

Humane Studies Minor | Sociology Major: Bach Arts | Sociology Minor
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Humane Studies Minor    
   Minor Courses (20 cr. to be chosen)    
      AGE 4000   Proposal Writing and Grant Administration (AGE*/EM/SOC) 2 cr.  The basic skills needed to develop and write a successful proposal to compete for funds from sources outside the control of the organization or agency. Topics include generating program ideas, researching funding sources, utilizing contacts, basic proposal format, self-funding, understanding the politics of grants, and the administration of and accounting for funds. 
      HUM 3210   Do Animals Matter? (HUM*/SSC) 3 cr.  Examination of ethical, cultural, aesthetic, and societal conceptualizations of animals and their impact on human-animal relations as well as on uses, treatment, and legal standing of animals. Issues are discussed through the lenses of humanities and social sciences within the framework of the Franciscan tradition. This course includes an academic service-learning project. 
      HUM 4300   Humane Studies (HUM*/SSC) 3 cr.  An exploration of the interface between social justice, animal welfare, and environmental protection through the lenses of humanities and social sciences. Current issues are discussed within the framework of the Franciscan tradition. 
      IDS 3410   Sustainability: Vision and Values (IDS*/RST) 3 cr.  Interdisciplinary overview of the concepts of sustainability, including its origins in spiritual traditions and its environmental, social, and economic dimensions. Allows for individualized exploration of topics such as food systems, climate, public policy, renewable energy, and green building. 
      RST 3100   Franciscan Values, Social Justice, and Service 3 cr.  Study of the life and legacy of Francis of Assisi as a prism for exploring social justice issues and the key Franciscan values not only essential to the Catholic perspective on the world and human existence, but also relevant to the perspectives of other religious traditions of the world. Analysis of the implications for addressing ecological responsibility and the call to justice, peace, and respect for all persons. 
      SOC 1300   Introduction to Community Leadership 1 cr.  Examination of various avenues to civic involvement and their importance in maintaining civil society, with an introduction to the communitarian philosophy and to principles and best practices in service-learning. Designed to prepare students to get the most out of their community service experiences. This course includes a 15-hour academic service-learning experience. 
      SOC 3120   Diversity, Discrimination, and Social Justice 3 cr.  Issues of diversity, discrimination, and social justice with particular attention given to institutions that provide human services (sociology, criminal justice, nursing, gerontology, social work, psychology, education): how marginalized populations (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, social class, medical/mental disability) are socially constructed; how these groups have been affected in the contexts of social stratification; institutional and structural discrimination; how economic, political, and cultural systems pose challenges to these marginalized groups; exploration of possible solutions. 
      SOC 3710   Special Topics in Sociology 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Analyses of current issues and topics from a sociological perspective. Normally offered in a weekend format. 
Sociology Major: Bach Arts    
   Major Courses (34 cr. to be chosen)    
      SOC 1020   Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.  Foundations and principles of social order, social control, social institutions, and social life in America and other cultures. Focus on how people’s conditions, character, and life chances are influenced by organizations and institutions. Emphasis on critical thinking about practices and beliefs in a variety of social contexts. 
      SOC 2020   Social Problems 3 cr.  Analysis of major social issues/problems in the US and globally from a sociological perspective. Consideration of national and international implications. Focus on issues of stratification (social class, race, gender), deviance, industrial conflict, warfare, environmental pollution, and consumption. Analyses of specific social movements that respond to political and economic contradictions. Focus areas may include: media and public opinion; social inequality and justice; social control and deviance; and belief, religion, and science. May include an academic service learning component. 
      SW  2290   Tools for Success in Social Work and Sociology (SOC/SW*) 1 cr.  For social work and sociology majors or individuals considering either major. Introduces American Psychological Association (APA) writing style, forms of professional writing required in social work generalist practice, elements of effective oral communication, library research and technology skills, resources available for success in the Social Work or Sociology Programs. Includes University-required Writing Assessment for students needing to complete this requirement. Prerequisite or corequisite (for social work majors only): SW 2300. Prerequisite or corequisite (for sociology majors only): SOC 2210. Course is graded as a S/F. 
      SOC 3950   Social Theory 3 cr.  An examination of classical and contemporary sociological theory as related to understanding social changes and research methodology. Focus on how theory provides the basis for interpreting the human condition, addressing social problems, and conducting empirical research regarding human behavior. Students examine and evaluate strategies for the improvement of society. Prerequisite: SOC 2020. 
      SW  3960   Social Research Methods (SOC/SW*) 4 cr.  Prepares students to become educated consumers of evidence-based social work and social science research to inform and improve practice, policy, and social service delivery. Orients to scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge through the use of quantitative and qualitative research processes. Emphasizes importance of understanding ethical considerations when conducting research with human subjects. Prerequisites: CIS 2380; SW 2300 (for social work majors only), SOC 2210 (for sociology majors only). 
      SW  4700   Practice Methods IV: Communities (SOC/SW*) 3 cr.  Fourth in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Examines perspectives and structures of community, focusing on oppression, discrimination, poverty, marginalization, alienation, factors of diversity and difference as well as sources of privilege and power as they impact social wellbeing. Emphasizes the application of planned change processes at the community level in response to changing contexts and needs to promote social and economic justice, and to advance the equitable distribution of basic human rights and resources. Prerequisite: SW 4350 for Social Work Students or SOC 1010 for all other students. 
      SOC 4900   Applied Social Research Methods 2 cr.  Application of qualitative and quantitative research methods in sociology and related social science disciplines utilizing the scientific method. Students have an opportunity to participate in the completion of a community-based research project and gain the practical experience needed in applied sociology. Major areas of sociological concern include the nature, scope, and logic of social changes. The course includes an exploration of specific strategies to improve society. Prerequisite: SW 3960. 
      SOC 4930   Sociology Internship 2 cr.  Professionally supervised practical experience (75 hours) in an approved setting, focusing on behavior of the individual, small groups, and community. Extends the student's sociological knowledge and skill base and provides an opportunity for the students to synthesize theory with practice while gaining practical work experience. To be taken in the final academic year of the program. 
      SOC 4950   Sociology Seminar 2 cr.  Capstone course for the sociology major. A review and consolidation of material covered throughout the major. Preparation of electronic portfolios of academic and professional work, including refining work completed for courses in the major. Includes focus on graduate school preparation and continued professional development. To be taken in the final academic year of the program. 
      Major electives (11 cr. to be chosen)    
         AGE 4000   Proposal Writing and Grant Administration (AGE*/EM/SOC) 2 cr.  The basic skills needed to develop and write a successful proposal to compete for funds from sources outside the control of the organization or agency. Topics include generating program ideas, researching funding sources, utilizing contacts, basic proposal format, self-funding, understanding the politics of grants, and the administration of and accounting for funds. 
         CJ  3210   Principles of Criminology (CJ*/FOR/SOC) 3 cr.  Study of the incidence, type, causes, and theories of adult deviant behavior. Emphasis is placed upon current crime trends and statistics and the processes involved in dealing with crime. 
         CJ  3230   Juvenile Justice (CJ*/SOC) 3 cr.  Theories of causation and prevention of delinquency; role of the courts, policy prevention programs, institutions in the control, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. 
         LAW 2100   Law, Society, and Politics (LAW*/PSC/SOC) 3 cr.  This course examines the social, political, and historical contexts of law as a social institution. Students will examine historical, political, and societal perspectives on why law is made, how it is made in legislatures and the courts, and how it shapes what individuals do on an everyday basis. Students focus on legal institutions and resolution processes including historical and recent case law, institutional political science, resultant social policy, and its impact on society through mixed media and an examination of case studies. 
         RST 3530   Marriage & the Family (FCS/RST*/SOC) 4 cr.  Marriage and family studied from the Biblical, theological, economic, technological, and sociological aspects. (Interdisciplinary.) Prerequisite: junior or senior status. 
         SM  2300   Social Issues in Sport Management 3 cr.  Analysis of critical issues and controversies in sport including the influences that social attitudes, media, politics, and the economy have on various sports institutions from childhood play to professional athletes. Includes perspectives on religion, deviance, violence, race, gender, and social class in sport. 
         SOC 1300   Introduction to Community Leadership 1 cr.  Examination of various avenues to civic involvement and their importance in maintaining civil society, with an introduction to the communitarian philosophy and to principles and best practices in service-learning. Designed to prepare students to get the most out of their community service experiences. This course includes a 15-hour academic service-learning experience. 
         SOC 2140   Conflict Resolution (EDU/SOC*/SW) 1 cr.  Introduces students to 21st century non-violent conflict resolution skills and knowledge. The class addresses non-violence, attitudes towards conflict, conflict styles, macro and micro levels of conflict processes, diversity, and methods of conflict resolution. The focus is interpersonal conflict resolution in the home and work. 
         SOC 3120   Diversity, Discrimination, and Social Justice 3 cr.  Issues of diversity, discrimination, and social justice with particular attention given to institutions that provide human services (sociology, criminal justice, nursing, gerontology, social work, psychology, education): how marginalized populations (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, social class, medical/mental disability) are socially constructed; how these groups have been affected in the contexts of social stratification; institutional and structural discrimination; how economic, political, and cultural systems pose challenges to these marginalized groups; exploration of possible solutions. 
         SOC 3130   Sociology of the Family 3 cr.  Analysis of the family as a major social institution, with consideration of the way forms of the family vary cross-culturally. Examination of how political and economic developments affect the family. Topics include: ethnic and social class variations in structure, patterns of mate selection, parenthood, parent-child interactions, divorce, and changing gender roles. 
         SOC 3250   Women & Violence 2 cr.  An examination of selected types of violence in women’s lives. Analysis of the social factors influencing women’s deviance, victimization, and criminality. Focus on the relationship between gender roles and violence, as well as the most common forms of violent behavior women encounter, such as rape, domestic battery, and prostitution. 
         SOC 3620   Society and Health: Sociological Perspectives 3 cr.  Individual and group responses to the meaning of the sick role and well-being, provider-patient relationships, structure of health care organizations, and issues of inequality within health care institutions. Topics include the effects of age, race, gender and socioeconomic status on health and wellness; the interrelationships between healers, patients and social institutions. Topics are examined through the sociological perspectives of conflict theory, functionalism, and symbolic interactionism. 
         SOC 3710   Special Topics in Sociology 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Analyses of current issues and topics from a sociological perspective. Normally offered in a weekend format. 
         SOC 3800   Sex & Gender Roles 3 cr.  An examination of the idea of socially constructed gender roles and how these roles changed historically in response to internal contradictions, as well as political and economic forces such as the women’s movement. Perspectives included from disciplines such as history, biology, anthropology, psychology, political science, and economics. Discussion of the interaction of race, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation with gender roles with an emphasis on multiculturalism and globalism. 
         SOC 4890   Seminar in Community Leadership 3 cr.  To prepare student for active civic engagement and eventual leadership. Purposeful civic learning through the student’s service learning leadership placement and the creation of a Community Leadership Portfolio. Analysis of the role of civic engagement and community involvement in the maintenance of civil society. This course includes a 30-hour academic service-learning experience. Prerequisites: SOC 1300, SOC 3120, SOC 3420. 
         SW  2160   Empathy Listening Skills (SOC/SW*) 1 cr.  Instruction and practice in the establishment of rapport with individuals through the use of empathic listening skills. The material is presented in the context of developing a helping relationship. 
Sociology Minor    
   Minor Courses (20 cr. to be chosen)    
      SOC 1020   Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.  Foundations and principles of social order, social control, social institutions, and social life in America and other cultures. Focus on how people’s conditions, character, and life chances are influenced by organizations and institutions. Emphasis on critical thinking about practices and beliefs in a variety of social contexts. 
      SOC 2020   Social Problems 3 cr.  Analysis of major social issues/problems in the US and globally from a sociological perspective. Consideration of national and international implications. Focus on issues of stratification (social class, race, gender), deviance, industrial conflict, warfare, environmental pollution, and consumption. Analyses of specific social movements that respond to political and economic contradictions. Focus areas may include: media and public opinion; social inequality and justice; social control and deviance; and belief, religion, and science. May include an academic service learning component. 
      SOC 3120   Diversity, Discrimination, and Social Justice 3 cr.  Issues of diversity, discrimination, and social justice with particular attention given to institutions that provide human services (sociology, criminal justice, nursing, gerontology, social work, psychology, education): how marginalized populations (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, social class, medical/mental disability) are socially constructed; how these groups have been affected in the contexts of social stratification; institutional and structural discrimination; how economic, political, and cultural systems pose challenges to these marginalized groups; exploration of possible solutions. 
      SOC 3620   Society and Health: Sociological Perspectives 3 cr.  Individual and group responses to the meaning of the sick role and well-being, provider-patient relationships, structure of health care organizations, and issues of inequality within health care institutions. Topics include the effects of age, race, gender and socioeconomic status on health and wellness; the interrelationships between healers, patients and social institutions. Topics are examined through the sociological perspectives of conflict theory, functionalism, and symbolic interactionism. 
      SW  4700   Practice Methods IV: Communities (SOC/SW*) 3 cr.  Fourth in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Examines perspectives and structures of community, focusing on oppression, discrimination, poverty, marginalization, alienation, factors of diversity and difference as well as sources of privilege and power as they impact social wellbeing. Emphasizes the application of planned change processes at the community level in response to changing contexts and needs to promote social and economic justice, and to advance the equitable distribution of basic human rights and resources. Prerequisite: SW 4350 for Social Work Students or SOC 1010 for all other students. 
      Minor electives (5 cr. to be chosen)    
         AGE 4000   Proposal Writing and Grant Administration (AGE*/EM/SOC) 2 cr.  The basic skills needed to develop and write a successful proposal to compete for funds from sources outside the control of the organization or agency. Topics include generating program ideas, researching funding sources, utilizing contacts, basic proposal format, self-funding, understanding the politics of grants, and the administration of and accounting for funds. 
         CJ  3210   Principles of Criminology (CJ*/FOR/SOC) 3 cr.  Study of the incidence, type, causes, and theories of adult deviant behavior. Emphasis is placed upon current crime trends and statistics and the processes involved in dealing with crime. 
         CJ  3230   Juvenile Justice (CJ*/SOC) 3 cr.  Theories of causation and prevention of delinquency; role of the courts, policy prevention programs, institutions in the control, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. 
         LAW 2100   Law, Society, and Politics (LAW*/PSC/SOC) 3 cr.  This course examines the social, political, and historical contexts of law as a social institution. Students will examine historical, political, and societal perspectives on why law is made, how it is made in legislatures and the courts, and how it shapes what individuals do on an everyday basis. Students focus on legal institutions and resolution processes including historical and recent case law, institutional political science, resultant social policy, and its impact on society through mixed media and an examination of case studies. 
         RST 3530   Marriage & the Family (FCS/RST*/SOC) 4 cr.  Marriage and family studied from the Biblical, theological, economic, technological, and sociological aspects. (Interdisciplinary.) Prerequisite: junior or senior status. 
         SM  2300   Social Issues in Sport Management 3 cr.  Analysis of critical issues and controversies in sport including the influences that social attitudes, media, politics, and the economy have on various sports institutions from childhood play to professional athletes. Includes perspectives on religion, deviance, violence, race, gender, and social class in sport. 
         SOC 1300   Introduction to Community Leadership 1 cr.  Examination of various avenues to civic involvement and their importance in maintaining civil society, with an introduction to the communitarian philosophy and to principles and best practices in service-learning. Designed to prepare students to get the most out of their community service experiences. This course includes a 15-hour academic service-learning experience. 
         SOC 2140   Conflict Resolution (EDU/SOC*/SW) 1 cr.  Introduces students to 21st century non-violent conflict resolution skills and knowledge. The class addresses non-violence, attitudes towards conflict, conflict styles, macro and micro levels of conflict processes, diversity, and methods of conflict resolution. The focus is interpersonal conflict resolution in the home and work. 
         SOC 3130   Sociology of the Family 3 cr.  Analysis of the family as a major social institution, with consideration of the way forms of the family vary cross-culturally. Examination of how political and economic developments affect the family. Topics include: ethnic and social class variations in structure, patterns of mate selection, parenthood, parent-child interactions, divorce, and changing gender roles. 
         SOC 3250   Women & Violence 2 cr.  An examination of selected types of violence in women’s lives. Analysis of the social factors influencing women’s deviance, victimization, and criminality. Focus on the relationship between gender roles and violence, as well as the most common forms of violent behavior women encounter, such as rape, domestic battery, and prostitution. 
         SOC 3710   Special Topics in Sociology 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Analyses of current issues and topics from a sociological perspective. Normally offered in a weekend format. 
         SOC 3800   Sex & Gender Roles 3 cr.  An examination of the idea of socially constructed gender roles and how these roles changed historically in response to internal contradictions, as well as political and economic forces such as the women’s movement. Perspectives included from disciplines such as history, biology, anthropology, psychology, political science, and economics. Discussion of the interaction of race, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation with gender roles with an emphasis on multiculturalism and globalism. 
         SOC 3950   Social Theory 3 cr.  An examination of classical and contemporary sociological theory as related to understanding social changes and research methodology. Focus on how theory provides the basis for interpreting the human condition, addressing social problems, and conducting empirical research regarding human behavior. Students examine and evaluate strategies for the improvement of society. Prerequisite: SOC 2020. 
         SOC 4890   Seminar in Community Leadership 3 cr.  To prepare student for active civic engagement and eventual leadership. Purposeful civic learning through the student’s service learning leadership placement and the creation of a Community Leadership Portfolio. Analysis of the role of civic engagement and community involvement in the maintenance of civil society. This course includes a 30-hour academic service-learning experience. Prerequisites: SOC 1300, SOC 3120, SOC 3420. 
         SOC 4900   Applied Social Research Methods 2 cr.  Application of qualitative and quantitative research methods in sociology and related social science disciplines utilizing the scientific method. Students have an opportunity to participate in the completion of a community-based research project and gain the practical experience needed in applied sociology. Major areas of sociological concern include the nature, scope, and logic of social changes. The course includes an exploration of specific strategies to improve society. Prerequisite: SW 3960. 
         SOC 4930   Sociology Internship 2 cr.  Professionally supervised practical experience (75 hours) in an approved setting, focusing on behavior of the individual, small groups, and community. Extends the student's sociological knowledge and skill base and provides an opportunity for the students to synthesize theory with practice while gaining practical work experience. To be taken in the final academic year of the program. 
         SW  2160   Empathy Listening Skills (SOC/SW*) 1 cr.  Instruction and practice in the establishment of rapport with individuals through the use of empathic listening skills. The material is presented in the context of developing a helping relationship. 
         SW  2290   Tools for Success in Social Work and Sociology (SOC/SW*) 1 cr.  For social work and sociology majors or individuals considering either major. Introduces American Psychological Association (APA) writing style, forms of professional writing required in social work generalist practice, elements of effective oral communication, library research and technology skills, resources available for success in the Social Work or Sociology Programs. Includes University-required Writing Assessment for students needing to complete this requirement. Prerequisite or corequisite (for social work majors only): SW 2300. Prerequisite or corequisite (for sociology majors only): SOC 2210. Course is graded as a S/F. 
         SW  3960   Social Research Methods (SOC/SW*) 4 cr.  Prepares students to become educated consumers of evidence-based social work and social science research to inform and improve practice, policy, and social service delivery. Orients to scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge through the use of quantitative and qualitative research processes. Emphasizes importance of understanding ethical considerations when conducting research with human subjects. Prerequisites: CIS 2380; SW 2300 (for social work majors only), SOC 2210 (for sociology majors only). 
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