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Undergraduate Admissions Information
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Madonna University
36600 Schoolcraft Road
Livonia, Michigan 48150-1176
(734) 432-5339 or (800) 852-4951, ext. 5339
Fax (734) 432-5424
Email: admissions@madonna.edu

Interdisciplinary Studies: Bach Arts
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Interdisciplinary Studies: Bach Arts    
   Required Courses    
      IDS 3000   Social Change and Challenges 3 cr.  An interdisciplinary exploration of a topic or theme related to global, technological, or societal issues, focusing on the pervasive long-term implications this issue will have for the future as well as the human dilemmas that will emerge. Emphasis on developing critical thinking and interdisciplinary problem-solving skills, particularly in the context of information access and management. A writing intensive course. 
      IDS 3020   Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies 3 cr.  Introduction to the field of interdisciplinary studies, the goals for the IDS major, the plan of study approval process, and of the capstone requirement for the major (portfolio or research project). 
      IDS 4950   IDS Senior Seminar 3 cr.  Culmination of the student's plan of study resulting in an interdisciplinary project, requiring a research paper or interdisciplinary/ multi-genre portfolio and an oral presentation. Students must demonstrate competency in writing, critical thinking, interdisciplinary problem-solving, and information management. Prerequisites: IDS 3000, IDS 3020; ENG 3100 (can be corequisite); and senior standing. 
      WRT 3100   Advanced Composition 3 cr.  Advanced study and application of the rhetorical elements of invention, form, and style in nonfiction writing. Emphasis on strategy and style in appealing to a variety of audiences. Class meetings include writers’ workshop format. Prerequisite: WRT 1020. 
      Hum Choice                (3 cr. to be chosen)    
         HUM 3050   The Idea of Justice (HUM*/RST) 4 cr.  An interdisciplinary study of justice based on an analysis of humanities texts from a variety of discourse communities in order to develop an appreciation of diverse concepts and expressions of justice. 
         HUM 3080   Nature and Scope of Inquiry 3 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Theme-based, highly interactive interdisciplinary course designed to enable students to explore the different approaches and ways of knowing that contribute to understanding and resolving complex issues, problems, or dilemmas of contemporary life. The course focuses on a compelling theme and is designed to develop the commitment to intellectual inquiry, humanistic values, and service to others as embodied in the mission of the University. 
         HUM 3090   Holocaust: Issues & Themes in the Genocide of European Jewry 4 cr.  Examination of the social and political forces and actions that enabled the Nazi regime to plan and carry out the systematic extermination of European Jewry. Analysis of the Nazi genocidal agenda, utilizing materials from history, literature, film, music, and the fine arts. An overview of the roots of anti-Semitism and of how a modern authoritarian regime employed historic stereotypes and prejudices in effectively enlisting a majority of its citizens in active or passive criminal complicity. Examination of the institutions of mass murder, the silence of church and state, and, despite this silence, the forces of resistance. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. 
      Upper Level Electives     (45 cr. to be chosen)    
         ACC 3030   Intermediate Accounting I 3 cr.  An intermediate level examination of the basic accounting statements and underlying accounting principles. Topics include: present value concepts, current assets and liabilities, and tangible and intangible assets. Prerequisite: ACC 2020. 
         ACC 3040   Intermediate Accounting II 3 cr.  A continuation of the intermediate level examination of the basic accounting statements and underlying accounting principles. Topics include: accounting for leases, pensions, income taxes, earnings per share, financial statement analysis, long-term liabilities, equity transactions, and cash flow statements. Prerequisite: ACC 3030. Must be taken at Madonna University. 
         ACC 3400   Accounting Information Systems 4 cr.  A study of fundamental principles of accounting and information systems data. Analysis related primarily to corporations and to cost accounting and management accounting topics encountered by accounting and computer personnel: design and control of systems for the origination, development, and use of accounting information systems, including an analysis of computer usage for accounting applications. Emphasis on the interrelationships among the components of an accounting system and the use of the personal computer in the maintenance and reporting of accounting information. Prerequisites: CIS 2380 and ACC 2010. 
         ACC 3580   Taxation I 3 cr.  A study of the principles of taxation emphasizing the individual as a taxable entity. Included is a study of tax law as it pertains to inclusions in gross income, exclusions from gross income, and deductions available to the taxpayer. Prerequisites: ACC 2020 and BL 3330 or instructor’s consent. Must be taken at Madonna University. 
         ACC 3610   Taxation II 3 cr.  Continued study of principles of taxation; emphasis on business entities, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: ACC 3580. 
         ACC 4050   Advanced Accounting 3 cr.  Advanced accounting theory as it applies to partnerships, consolidated financial statements, bankruptcy, and international accounting. Prerequisite: ACC 3040. 
         ACC 4060   Government & Non-Profit Accounting 3 cr.  Emphasis placed on in-depth analysis of accounting principles and procedures applicable to governmental units and non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: ACC 3040. 
         ACC 4500   Auditing 3 cr.  Analysis of the audit process, the audit examination, and procedures for completing the audit test. Emphasis on generally accepted auditing standards and professional ethics. Prerequisite: ACC 3040. 
         ACC 4700   Advanced Managerial/Cost Accounting 3 cr.  Advanced study of various costing methodologies and their interrelationship to managerial issues for planning, managing, controlling, and evaluating business operations. Topics include standard costing and variance analysis, sales variances, process costing issues, allocation methods for service departments and joint/by-product costs, determination of cost functions, transfer pricing, interrelationship with operations research, and strategic control systems. Prerequisites: ACC 3130, FIN 3150, MKT 2440 and QS 3550. Must be taken at Madonna University. 
         ACC 4710   Brunch with an Expert Seminar 1 cr.  A comprehensive review of the literature on a specific topic. Students prepare a summary presentation which would be suitable for corporate or appropriate audiences. 
         ACC 4720   Literature Review Seminar 3 cr.  A comprehensive review of the literature on a specific topic. Students prepare a summary presentation which would be suitable for corporate or appropriate audiences. 
         ACC 4730   Research Seminar 3 cr.  Students and faculty work together on a research project. Topics may be suggested by students to faculty, may emerge as a result of study in a class, or may be an area of interest for the faculty. 
         ACC 4740   General Topic Seminar 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  State-of-the-art or leading edge or applied topics that need to be expanded beyond the courses offered by the School of Business. (1-3 cr.) 
         ACC 4750   Leadership Seminar 1 cr.  Focus on content important to leadership development. Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         AHIS3250   Art History: Ancient to Renaissance 4 cr.  Study of painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts from prehistoric, ancient Greek, Roman, and medieval periods through the early Renaissance. 
         AHIS3260   Art History: Renaissance to 20th Century 4 cr.  Study of significant examples of painting, architecture, and sculpture from the high Renaissance in Italy, northern and southern Baroque masters, Rococo to 20th century. 
         AHIS3280   Dynamic Detroit Architecture 2 cr.  A concentrated study of the architecture in Metro Detroit as it reflects the development of American architecture in the past three hundred years. Lectures and class discussions are supplemented by field trips to principal sites of significant architecture in Detroit and the surrounding areas. No prerequisites. 
         AHIS3350   Asian Art: India, China, Japan 3 cr.  A study of the architecture, sculpture, painting, decorative arts, bronzes, ceramics, and garden designs in India, China, and Japan. Correlation of these artifacts with the social, religious, cultural, and historic climate of these cultures. Emphasis placed on the understanding and appreciation of the creativity evident in both historic works and modern works of art of the 20-21st centuries, continuing the traditions while introducing new stylistic and content imagery. 
         AHIS4150   Modern Art: Late 19th & 20th Century Art 4 cr.  A study of the painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts, and new media of the 19th and 20th century artist, beginning with art movements and the development of the “avant-garde" concepts, continuing through to the most recent post-modern expressions in the visual arts. The significance of individuals both within and outside of artistic movements is contrasted. Emphasis placed on the understanding and appreciation of the creativity evident in the various modern expressions of the visual arts in the West, along with the new expressions evident in non-western art of India, China, Japan, and Korea. 
         AHIS4750   Studies in Art History 3 cr.  Topics in art history vary according to period, artists, school, culture, or patronage. Prerequisite: ART 2020 or permission of instructor. 
         ART 3100   Advertising Design 4 cr.  A third-level examination of advanced terminology, processes, and procedures in graphic design. Special emphasis on advertising campaigns and the different formats used in them, such as editorial series, outdoor and indoor signage, promotional packaging, and direct mail design, with an introduction to art direction through storyboarding. Prerequisite: ART 2680. 
         ART 3150   Photoshop (ART*/BCA/JRN) 3 cr.  Introduction to a variety of image processing capabilities, with an emphasis on the development of original images related to art and publication design. Students learn to combine basic design, drawing, and composition techniques within the technical framework of computer design which includes image conversion, color correction, manipulating layers, working with paths, websites, and print preparation. Prerequisite: ART 2700 or permission of instructor. 
         ART 3300   Advanced Drawing 3 cr.  Life drawing among a variety of subjects, developing contemporary approaches to realistic and abstract compositions. 
         ART 3310   Advanced Painting 3 cr.  Advanced level instruction in one of the following media: oil, watercolor, acrylics, or mixed media. 
         ART 3360   Figure Drawing and Anatomy 3 cr.  Life drawing from the human figure and a study of anatomy for the artist. A variety of approaches to the figure are explored, as well as a choice of drawing techniques. Prerequisites: ART 1050 and ART 2070. 
         ART 3390   Oriental Brushwork 2 cr.  A studio course based on the theory and practice of Chinese and Japanese ink brush painting. Lecture and grinding of ink and painting each class. 
         ART 3460   Relief & Silkscreen Printing 3 cr.  Principles and techniques of making multiple images from relief surfaces such as linoleum, wood block, and from stencil printing, particularly silkscreen. Prerequisites: ART 1050, 2070, or permission of instructor. 
         ART 3800   Web Design for Graphic Designers 3 cr.  Study of a specific web-design program such as Flash or Dreamweaver. Students build on previous computer and design skills to master key program functions, including tools and palettes, in constructing graphic design projects. Prerequisite: ART 2680. 
         ART 4080   Three Dimensional Forms 4 cr.  An upper-level studio course in which students are expected to explore techniques of sculpture which expose them to subtractive and additive methods and materials, such as: clay, stone, plaster, and wax. Consideration of the materials used in fabrication, such as wood, metal, and plastic. Students are expected to be self-directed in the subjects they choose to explore, develop, and pursue. Students are further required to research traditional and contemporary sculpture as a way to develop their own curiosity in the medium. Dialogue between instructor and student to develop effective critical thought. 
         ART 4250   Advanced Graphic Design 4 cr.  Advanced-level exploration of processes and procedures in graphic design. Special emphasis on branding and identity design is achieved through projects using research and conceptual skills. Development of an effective student career portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 2680; recommended ART 3110 or 3700. 
         ART 4280   Advanced Sculpture 3 cr.  A hands-on experience in which the student is actively engaged in the creative process. At this level, students are allowed a good deal of freedom in their choice of content and form-making. Modeling, casting, carving, additive methods, and transformative methods are all possible approaches. Students may also choose to combine various techniques. Subject matter (content) and materials are determined by the student in consultation with the instructor. 
         ART 4400   Advanced Studio 2 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Independent advanced work in media and disciplines not currently offered, such as advanced painting, drawing, design, sculpture, advertising, etc. Permission of department head and instructor required. 
         ART 4410   Advanced Studio 2 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Independent advanced work in media and disciplines not currently offered, such as advanced painting, drawing, design, sculpture, advertising, etc. Permission of department head and instructor required. 
         ART 4470   Intaglio (Etching) 3 cr.  A studio course designed to introduce the various intaglio processes: etching, aquatint, dry point, and the exploration of color and black-and-white printing. Principles of historical and contemporary techniques are approached and discussed. 
         ART 4480   Lithography 3 cr.  A studio course designed to introduce both stone and metal-plate lithography. Printing in both color and black-and-white, advanced exploration and experimentation are encouraged and desired. Principles of historical and contemporary techniques are approached and discussed. 
         AS  3390   Addiction Studies: Dual Diagnosis (AS*/PSY) 1 cr.  An introduction to understanding the assessment and treatment of individuals who have a dual disorder of mental illness and chemical dependency, including presentation of specific intervention strategies and program designs. 
         AS  3430   Addiction Studies: Focus on the Individual 1 cr.  Identification of the individual with a chemical dependency disorder: the stages of addiction, assessment instruments, care management, and relapse prevention. 
         AS  3440   Addiction Studies: Family Systems 1 cr.  Chemical dependency and the family: analysis of family roles, rules, relationships, and rituals. Discussion of the dynamics of codependency, adult children of chemically dependent families, family violence, and resources for recovery. 
         AS  3460   Addiction Studies:  Prevention 1 cr.  An overview of current strategies used in prevention programs. Introduction to school- based and community programs on the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Review of local, state, and national efforts including campus prevention. 
         AS  3540   Substance Users & HIV/AIDS 1 cr.  An introduction to issues relevant to the chemical dependency treatment field as it encounters the impact of HIV/AIDS: factors related to treatment considerations, methods for reducing high risk behaviors, prevention measures, high risk groups, social interventions, and epidemiologic and psychiatric data. Also, pertinent information on the connection between drug usage and HIV/AIDS in the treatment field. 
         AS  3560   Addiction Studies: Grief & Loss 1 cr.  The grief and loss issues that confront individuals in recovery: concerns such as family dysfunction, interpersonal loss, life review and repair, and life-style changes discussed in the context of chemical dependency treatment. 
         AS  3570   Addiction Studies:  Staff and Program Development 1 cr.  An introduction to developing effective chemical dependency treatment programs. Emphasis on program design, grant writing, funding, human resource development, team building, conflict resolution, and supervision. 
         AS  3610   Addiction Studies: Recovery & Spirituality 1 cr.  Spirituality as a key element of chemical dependency treatment. Themes such as healing, forgiveness, and acceptance discussed within the context of addiction and holistic recovery. Specific intervention strategies presented to deal with this vital therapeutic issue, including the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. 
         AS  3620   Addiction Studies: Adolescence 1 cr.  Identification of issues unique to adolescent chemical dependence. Analysis of the stages of emotional growth and social development, effects on parents and siblings, and obstacles to treatment. 
         AS  3630   Addiction Studies: Older Adults (AS*/AGE) 1 cr.  The issues of chemical dependency and the older adult. Focus on assessment, psychosocial factors, treatment strategies, model program designs, and other community resources that address this high-risk client population. 
         AS  3650   Addiction Studies:  Women 1 cr.  Identification of the issues specifically related to women with addictions. Discussion include the emotional dynamics of guilt and shame, the impact of societal values, obstacles to treatment, and state-of-the-art intervention approaches. 
         AS  3760   Problem Gambling: Assessment & Treatment 1 cr.  An introduction to the dynamics of gambling as an addictive behavior: the scope of the problem, types of gamblers, state-of-the-art testing instruments, intervention strategies, and multifaceted family issues. Special populations, such as adolescents and older adults are highlighted. 
         AS  3870   Addiction Studies: Neurobiology of Drug Addiction (AS*/PSY) 1 cr.  An overview of normal brain functioning and the influence of addictive drugs like heroin and cocaine on brain cells; the evidence for the brain’s reward pathway as a crucial neural substrate for drug addiction; drug tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal defined in neurophysiological terms. 
         AS  4490   Addiction Studies: Planning & Treatment 1 cr.  Introducing the procedures of planning and treatment in the field: assessment of problems, development of treatment plans, creation of behaviorally-specific goals and objectives, designing interventions, and planning for the termination of treatment. Students learn skills in clinical problem solving and the documentation of interventions and outcomes. 
         BIO 3010   Genetics with Lab 4 cr.  Principles of genetic theory with its application to plants, animals, microorganisms, and humans. and techniques (including statistics). Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: 12 cr. of biology including BIO 2260; MTH 2350; CHM 3610 recommended. 
         BIO 3150   Human Genetics & Society 3 cr.  The new genetics affects us all and the ethical, legal, and social implications of this technology will impact society for years to come. Students research topics of contemporary significance using tools of classical genetics such as the pedigree and the genetic code as well as RFLP markers, PCR technology, and cytogenetics based on DNA probes. (For non-science majors; does not apply to Biology major or minor.) 
         BIO 3170   Parasitology w/Lab (BIO*/MTE) 4 cr.  Study focuses upon the morphology, classification, and clinical diagnosis of major human parasites. Laboratory emphasizes the identification of parasitic adult and larval forms as observed in clinical specimens. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: BIO 2260. 
         BIO 3210   General Ecology 3 cr.  Study of the principles of ecological interdependence and interaction between plants and animals with each other and with their environment. An overview of research methods used in field studies complements theoretical concepts in lecture. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory/field 3 hours. Prerequisite: 6 cr. in biology; MTH 2350. 
         BIO 3280   Immunology with Lab 4 cr.  Basic principles of immunology and serology with emphasis on the nature of antigens and antibodies, the theories of the immune response, and the application of principles in hypersensitivity, tumor, and transplantation immunology. Theory and practice of serological techniques including immunoprecipitation, agglutination, and complement-mediated cell lysis. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIO 2260 and CHM 3610; BIO 3010 recommended. 
         BIO 3300    
         BIO 3450   Epidemiology 3 cr.  Study of factors involved in the occurrence and prevention of diseases within human populations. Prerequisite: BIO 2260. 
         BIO 3500   Medical Mycology (BIO*/MTE) 4 cr.  Studies in the isolation and identification of fungi with emphasis on the fungi of medical importance. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: BIO 2260. 
         BIO 3710   Pathophysiology 3 cr.  Study of mechanisms of disease processes affecting hematologic, immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, neural, liver and biliary, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems with associated manifestrations, diagnosis, and treatment regimens. Prerequisites: BIO 2430 and BIO 2440. 
         BIO 4010   Population Genetics (BIO*/FOR) 3 cr.  Theory and application of population genetics with emphasis on mathematical and statistical methods for describing specific populations, genetic make-up and diversity. 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 3010, MTH 1210, and MTH 2350. 
         BIO 4270   Clinical Bacteriology with Lab 4 cr.  Study of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacteriology in relation to diseases as found in humans. Methods of detection, isolation, and enumeration, toxin production, and techniques in the identification of pathogenic bacteria. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: BIO 2260; BIO 3280 recommended. 
         BIO 4410   Molecular Biology 3 cr.  Introductory course in molecular biology, including a description of common techniques used by molecular biologists and a detailed comparison of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells with respect to the details of transcription, post-transcriptional events, translation, gene regulation, and DNA replication. Prerequisites: BIO 3010 and CHM 3610. 
         BIO 4700   Biological Investigation 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Independent research, directed reading, or special problems under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: recommendation of major advisor and problem director. 
         BL  3330   Business Law I 3 cr.  Study of the law and the legal process as it relates to business and society. Emphasis on the law of contracts, sales under the U.C.C., negotiable instruments, secured transactions, and agency. Basic concepts of the law of crimes and torts, including products liabilities and performing legal research. Prerequisite: MGT 2360 or consent of instructor. 
         BL  3500   Employment Law 3 cr.  Recognizing those organizational policies and practices that may put the firm’s assets at risk. Emphasis on the statutory, case, and regulatory approaches which business must understand in order to be successful. 
         BL  4330   Business Law II 3 cr.  A continuation of Business Law 3330, with emphasis on the legal aspects of corporations and partnerships, property rights, debtor-creditor relations, and securities regulation. The general principles of governmental regulation of business and the legal aspects of international business transactions explored. Prerequisite: BL 3330. 
         BUS 3530   Foundations of e-Commerce 3 cr.  The core concepts of e-commerce management and strategy. Emphasis on the decision-making process used to begin, develop, and run an e-business and an organizational model which shows the relationship between management and human resource administration, marketing, accounting, finance, statistical analysis, consumer demand, and technology. Prerequisites: CIS 2380, MKT 2440, MGT 2360. 
         BUS 3950   Business & Society 3 cr.  A conceptual course which studies the historic and sociological relationship between business and society, the development of economic and management thought, and the social responsibility of business. Prerequisites: junior standing, MKT 2440 and MGT 2360. 
         BUS 4710   Brunch with an Expert Seminar 1 cr.  A comprehensive review of the literature on a specific topic. Students prepare a summary presentation which would be suitable for corporate or appropriate audiences. 
         BUS 4720   Literature Review Seminar 3 cr.  A comprehensive review of the literature on a specific topic. Students prepare a summary presentation which would be suitable for corporate or appropriate audiences. 
         BUS 4730   Research Seminar 3 cr.  Students and faculty work together on a research project. Topics may be suggested by students to faculty, may emerge as a result of study in a class, or may be an area of interest for the faculty. 
         BUS 4740   General Topic Seminar 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  State-of-the-art or leading edge or applied topics that need to be expanded beyond the courses offered by the School of Business. (1-3 cr.). Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr. of seminars. 
         BUS 4750   Leadership Seminar 1 cr.  Focus on content important to leadership development. Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         CD  4500   Issues Challenging Children & Families (CD*/FCS) 3 cr.  A survey of issues that present challenges to children and families Students learn how current societal factors present stress to the family as it seeks to nurture the emotional/social and cognitive development of children. Assessment of community resources available for families. 
         CHM 3310   Quantitative Analysis 4 cr.  Theory and techniques of classical quantitative analysis, including acquisition and evaluation of analytical data from gravimetry, titrimetry, potentiometry, and spectrophotometry techniques. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, 1120, 2210, MTH 1210 or equivalent. 
         CHM 3510   Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 cr.  Descriptive chemistry of the representative elements, transition metal complexes and organometallic compounds; ligand field theory, molecular orbital and valence bond theories, symmetry and group theory, nuclear chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, 1120, MTH 1210 or equivalent. 
         CHM 3610   Biochemistry I (BIO/CHM*) 4 cr.  Principles of biochemistry; major metabolic and biosynthetic pathways; structure and conformation of biological molecules and their molecular biology. Laboratory exercises in enzyme kinetics, electrophoresis, chromatography, and DNA isolation and manipulation. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, 2210. 
         CHM 3620   Biochemistry II (BIO/CHM*) 4 cr.  Advanced treatment of modern topics, including DNA structure and function; gene control; recombinant techniques; and newer techniques of protein design and engineering. Laboratory exercises in molecular cloning, transformation, DNA transfer techniques, immunoprecipitation, and mutagenesis studies. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM1110, 2210, and 3610 
         CHM 4410   Physical Chemistry I 4 cr.  Kinetics, mechanisms, rate laws, properties of solids, liquids, and gases; kinetic theory of gases, phase rules, thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical activity, and electrochemistry; introduction to statistical mechanics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites :CHM 1110, 1120, 2210; MTH 2510, 2520; PHY 2530, 2540. 
         CHM 4420   Physical Chemistry II 4 cr.  Atomic and molecular structure, quantum theory and mechanics, analytical spectroscopy, selection rules, photochemistry. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, 1120,2210, 4410; MTH 2510, 2520; PHY 2530, 2540. 
         CHM 4510   Instrumental Analysis 4 cr.  Theory and techniques of modern instrumental analysis including UV, visible, and IR spectrophotometry; NMR, EPR, and mass spectroscopies; electrochemistry; chromatography including HPLC; other current topics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, 1120, 2210; MTH 1210 or 2510 and 2520; PHY 2530, 2540. 
         CHM 4900   Problems in Chemistry 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Advanced study in a special area of interest in laboratory or library research studies. Prerequisite: recommendation of major advisor. 
         CJ  3010   Basic Criminal Justice Training 3 cr.  Credit awarded to those who have successfully completed an approved Michigan regional police or correctional academy, federal law enforcement academy, or equivalent CJ instruction. 
         CJ  3050   Criminal Procedures (CJ*/FOR) 3 cr.  Procedural law for law enforcement officers. Law of arrest, evidence, and search and seizure. 
         CJ  3110   Criminal Investigation  (CJ*/FOR) 3 cr.  Basic principles and procedures of criminal investigation; conduct at crime scene; search, collection and preservation of evidence; interviewing; and methods used in crime laboratories. 
         CJ  3210   Principles of Criminology (CJ*/FOR/SOC) 3 cr.  Study of the incidence, type, causes, and theories of adult deviant behavior. Emphasis is placed upon current crime trends and statistics and the processes involved in dealing with crime. 
         CJ  3230   Juvenile Justice (CJ*/SOC) 3 cr.  Theories of causation and prevention of delinquency; role of the courts, policy prevention programs, institutions in the control, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. 
         CJ  3500   Homeland Security & Terrorism (CJ*/EM) 3 cr.  Examination of the nature of the threat to the United States and how America is responding to the danger of terrorism, international and domestic. The policies, principles, strategies, organizations, and programs that are responsible for protecting the homeland. The efforts of the federal government, state, and local governments, as well as business and private citizens, are explored. Prerequisite:CJ1020 or permission of instructor. 
         CJ  3550   Parole & Probation 3 cr.  Examination of the history and philosophy of probation, aftercare, parole, and other community-based programs for juvenile and adult clients; function and operation of parole authorities; statutory authorization; case law; current practices and trends. Prerequisites: CJ 1020 and 1210. 
         CJ  4050   Constitutional Law (CJ*/PSC) 3 cr.  Introduction to constitutional law, political theory. Historical examination of the major Supreme Court decisions which have contributed to contemporary judicial interpretations of the Constitution. 
         CJ  4110   Ethics in Criminal Justice 3 cr.  An examination of the multitude of ethical dilemmas encountered in the criminal justice system. Ethical issues inherent in a variety of practical situations identified and discussed. Focus on problem solving strategies, interpersonal skills, and professional considerations relevant to criminal justice practitioners. Course discussions and group work provide a foundation for ethical decision-making related to policing, the courts, corrections, interpersonal relations, and diversity. 
         CJ  4120   Organized Crime & Gangs in America 3 cr.  An exploration of the history, scope, and methods of controlling organized crime and street gangs in America with emphasis on local, regional, and statewide crime control efforts. The social implications of both organized crime and gangs. Research and discussion of federal and state laws aimed at curbing this type of crime. 
         CJ  4140   Drugs, Crime & the Justice System 3 cr.  Study of issues and problems relating to drug and alcohol abuse, impact of substance use on individual health and societal progress, identification and classification of abused drugs, problems faced by law enforcement efforts to control. 
         CJ  4230   Homicide Investigation 3 cr.  Study of many facets which comprise a thorough, sound, and reliable homicide investigation; inquiry into new investigative techniques as well as a review of State laws concerning homicide. Consideration of case preparation, warrant writing, arrests, arraignment, and preliminary examinations. 
         CJ  4750   Special Topics in Criminal Justice 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  A specialized course dealing, each time it is scheduled, with some particular aspect of criminal justice not usually included in other criminal justice course offerings. Examination of contemporary issues, problems, present status, future development, and the criminal justice response to a specific problem. 
         COM 2350   Public Speaking: Theory & Practice 3 cr.  Focus on the building of public speaking skills needed in education, personal life, and careers in order to effectively communicate thoughts and feelings. Students evaluate the communication efforts of others and increase their critical listening skills. 
         COM 3410   Acting Techniques I 4 cr.  Basic forms and methods of expression, including voice projection and diction; development of individual talents in pantomime, improvisation, acting, and oral interpretation. Lecture and laboratory. 
         COM 3420   Acting Techniques II 4 cr.  Basic forms and methods of expression, including voice projection and diction; development of individual talents in pantomime, improvisation, acting, and oral interpretation. Lecture and laboratory. 
         CSC 3030   Operating Systems 3 cr.  Focuses on the major components of a computer operating system and the general operation of these components. Course concepts include: memory management, processor management, processes, communication and synchronization, shared resources, resource allocation, device management, file management, and security issues. Prerequisite: CSC 2080. 
         CSC 3050   Computer Architecture 3 cr.  Study of: digital logic circuits and their components, numeric and character data representation within computer memory, instruction formats and addressing modes, register transfer and micro-operations, micro-programmed control, the differences between CISC and RISC architectures, and pipelined and vector processing. Prerequisite: CSC 2080. 
         CSC 3280   Analysis of Algorithms 3 cr.  The study of data structures and their relationship to algorithms. Concepts include: algorithm and data abstraction, analysis of both iterative and recursive algorithms to determine time and space complexity, and various sorting, graph, and hashing algorithms. Students design programs to study algorithms and their application utilizing various data structures such as lists, queues, stacks, and trees. Prerequisite: CSC 2480. 
         CSC 3290   Programming Language Concepts 3 cr.  Focuses on the study of programming languages. Topics include the history of programming languages, virtual machines, the representation of data types, sequence and data control, type checking, memory management, programming language semantics, and parsing. Various current and historical programming languages are compared, including C++, Fortran, Pascal, Ada, Java, JavaScript, Python, Perl, PHP, and Lisp. Prerequisite: CSC 2080. 
         CSC 3350   Java Programming 3 cr.  Focuses on developing Java applications and applets for the Internet. Basic programming concepts studied include: control structures, arrays, methods, strings, and objects. Advanced topics such as graphics, user interface components, exception handling, multithreading, multimedia, and streaming applications are also covered. Prerequisites: CSC2480 
         CSC 3490   Artificial Intelligence 3 cr.  Introduction to a wide range of issues and methods in artificial intelligence. Topics covered include: reasoning and problem solving, heuristic search, game playing, knowledge representation, natural language processing, logic, and expert systems. Students are also introduced to the LISP programming language. Prerequisites: CSC 3290. 
         CSC 4130   Language Theory 3 cr.  A study of regular languages, grammars and expressions, finite-state automata and their relationship to regular languages, context-free languages and grammars, and language recognition with stack machines and parsers. Course includes introduction to properties of formal languages, computability, undecidability, and computational complexity. Prerequisites: CSC 329 
         ECN 3940   Economic Geography 3 cr.  Geography from an economic perspective: locations and locational changes in primary, secondary, and tertiary production services; a comparative analysis of global demography; role and rise of the city and the metropolis; effects of technology; nations and regional and strategic political and commercial alignments and realignments; natural and human resources; the less-developed, more-developed, and developing worlds; “core” and “periphery;” multinational corporations and the “global village.” Prerequisites: ECN 2720, INB 3140, MGT 2360, and QS 3550. 
         EDU 3120   Educational Psychology 4 cr.  Focus on the learning process: role of the teacher in learning; efficiency of learning as it is affected by the developmental processes; psychological principles that are central to the learning process and their relationship to the teaching situation; variables in learning; and evaluation of the outcomes of learning. Application of learning theory and multicultural concepts in a field-based context. Includes a 1 hour field experience (30 clock hours). Prerequisites: PSY 1010 and EDU 2000. 
         EDU 3210   Theory & Principles of Reading Instruction 3 cr.  Study of theory and process in developmentally-appropriate, evidenced-based reading/writing instruction, including language and literacy acquisition, word recognition, comprehension and fluency, vocabulary, methods of instruction and assessment, program development, and planning for differentiated instruction. Prerequisites: PSY 1010, EDU 2000. Prerequisite or corequisite: EDU 3120. 
         EDU 3300   The Exceptional Learner in the Classroom 3 cr.  Development of a working knowledge of the historical perspective of present special education programs, the effects of litigation, and the continuum of special education services. Identifying, evaluating, and differentiating instruction for students with special needs by way of a continuum of services in the least-restrictive environment. Response-to-intervention; positive behavior support; collaboration with school personnel and parents; community resources. Fifteen-clock-hour field experience required. 
         EDU 3350   Language Arts & Linguistics Foundations 3 cr.  Application of linguistic theory to language arts education, including an overview of structural and transformational linguistics, and its impact on oral and written communication; techniques of handwriting, and an exploration of the theory and techniques of listening, speaking, and writing effectively in the English language. Prerequisite: EDU 3210. 
         EDU 3460   Instructional Media 2 cr.  Use of media and technology in the classroom to enhance teacher productivity and student learning. Development of objective-based lesson plans using technology to support a constructivist approach to establishing a learning environment. Demonstration of the ability to use commercially available software to prepare classroom presentations and instructional web sites. Issues related to “fair usage” and copyrights addressed. 
         EDU 4120    
         EDU 4220   Reading in Content Areas 3 cr.  Study of the principles, techniques, and processes of evidence-based literacy instruction needed for students to be independent, strategic learners in the content areas taught in elementary and middle school. Application of learned principles and practices to teaching situations through the tutorial field experience. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisites: EDU 3120, EDU 3210, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
         EDU 4250   Literacy Education in the Secondary School 4 cr.  Introduction to the theoretical foundation for teaching reading and writing as cognitive processes essential for higher cognitive thinking, critical literacy, and mastery of the content areas taught in middle schools and high schools. Emphasis is placed on the principles, techniques, and processes of evidence-based literacy instruction to enable students to be independent, strategic learners in the secondary schools.. Application of learned principles and practices in a one-on-one teaching situation. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: EDU 3120 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
         EDU 4400   Behavior Management in the Classroom 2 cr.  Focus on understanding the role of the teacher in facilitating change in the classroom; the nature of, and factors affecting student behavior; the investigation and evaluation of classroom management models; and strategies for handling disruptive student behavior, with emphasis on prevention of classroom problems. Application of classroom management strategies, anti-bullying and classroom/student interventions in actual problem situations. Prerequisites: EDU 3120 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
         EDU 4800   Foundations of Education 3 cr.  The study of the scope and nature of education, primarily at the elementary and secondary levels, in the United States, as reflected in the historical, political, economic, sociological, and philosophical forces affecting the school and other social institutions, with emphasis on the origins and evolution of various current educational practices, policies, and issues. Prerequisites: EDU 2000 and 3120 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
         ENG 3000   Children's Literature & Drama (COM/ENG*) 4 cr.  Classical and contemporary writing for children; dramatization of stories. Selection of materials with reference to the interest, needs, and abilities of children. (NOTE: This course fulfills the upper division literature General Education Requirement for students in the Elementary Provisional Certificate program only. Students who begin elementary certification and transfer out must fulfill Goal 3.C. with a course listed on page 50.) 
         ENG 3010   Major American Writers: Beginnings to 1900 4 cr.  A study of those writers who expressed in distinctive styles the diverse elements of the American experience from early Amerindian folktales through the end of the nineteenth century, often including Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, and Douglass. 
         ENG 3020   Major American Writers: 1900 to Present 4 cr.  Critical examination of major writers in diverse genres who have explored the changing values and concerns of American society through the twentieth century and into the early years of the twenty-first century; minority and ethnic perspectives are expressly noted. 
         ENG 3060   Cultural Diversity: Living & Work in a Global Community (BUS/ENG*) 1 cr.  Study of the ways people of different nations work, live, communicate, and relate to each other, based on a working definition of "culture". The course is an effective supplement to INB 4930. Students who have completed ENG 2620 do not receive credit for ENG 3060. 
         ENG 3540   American Folklore & Literature 4 cr.  Study and practice of the methods used to analyze folklore examine folkloristics as a discipline, and explore the relationship between folklore and literature. Students read and write about works of American literature in which folkloric phenomena have been simulated and transformed by American writers for literary purposes, and complete a collection project. 
         ENG 3550   Women in Literature 4 cr.  Study of representative prose and poetry by and about women which focuses on their search for independence and fulfillment. 
         ENG 3610   Major British Writers:  Chaucer to Johnson 4 cr.  A study of principal figures in British literature from the fourteenth through the eighteenth century; includes Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Pope, and Samuel Johnson. 
         ENG 3620   Major British Writers:  Blake to Eliot 4 cr.  An examination of major British authors from the Romantic period to the post World War I era; includes Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Coleridge, Byron, Tennyson, Browning, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, Conrad, Yeats, Joyce, and T.S. Eliot. 
         ENG 3710   Contemporary Literature 4 cr.  A study of contemporary authors who may be classified as Modernist or Postmodern; figures may include principal ethnic and minority writers. 
         ENG 4010   Cultures & Languages of European Union 1951-2003 (BUS/ENG*) 1 cr.  The cultures and languages of the original fifteen European nations, how each nation is distinct yet interconnected, and how, despite their differences, a new sense of a shared vision of Europe is emerging that will help define their goals for the future. 
         ENG 4020   Cultures & Languages of European Union 2004-Present (BUS/ENG*) 1 cr.  The recent expansion of the European Union, the positive and negative impact of the expansion on the EU, as well as the mentality, expectations, and economic and cultural diversity that the new nations bring to the entity that is Europe. 
         ENG 4030   Contemporary French Culture Through Film (BUS/ENG*) 1 cr.  A primer on French culture focusing primarily on the French education system, child rearing, lifestyle, personal values, work ethic, communication, and interpersonal relationships. Scenes from French films are used to demonstrate common French attitudes and behaviors. 
         ENG 4100   Approaches to Teaching: Eco- Literature 1 cr.   
         ENG 4210   Time & Literature (ENG*/HIS) 4 cr.  Interdisciplinary analysis of a particular period, event, or personality in terms of the human dilemmas and choices which are confronted. 
         ENG 4230   Voices & Visions: Modern American Poets 4 cr.  The lives and works of classic American modern poets, including Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, Elizabeth Bishop, and others, explored in relationship to our own lives and works. Emphasis on ways to appreciate and enjoy the art of poetry. Videos or DVDs from the Voices and Visions television series are an integral part of the course. 
         ENG 4240   Cultural Issues in Contemporary Literature Film 1 cr.  Interdisciplinary examinations of contemporary cultural issues through literature and film. May be repeated for credit with new topic. Four completed offerings accumulate to meet Goal 3.C. 
         ENG 4380   Literature for Young Adults (EDU/ENG*) 4 cr.  Study of genres and themes presented by contemporary writers of literature for young people: violence in society, search for identity, family life, friendship, historical fiction, poetry, short stories, adventure, and fantasy. Emphasis is given to methods of connecting young adult literature to the target audience. NOTE: This course fulfills the upper-division literature General Education Requirement for students in the Secondary Provisional Certificate program only. 
         ENG 4540   Classics of African American Literature 4 cr.  Focus on African-American literature in all three genres: prose, poetry, and drama. Course content includes significant African- American writers from the 18th-19th centuries (Jacobs, Douglass) but focuses primarily on 20th century works by Hughes, Hurston, Baldwin, Ellison, Wilson, Morrison, and others. 
         ENG 4550   Voices of Pluralism in American Literature 4 cr.  Focus on minority literatures besides African-American literature. Course content includes, but is not limited to, Asian-American, Arab-American, Latino-American, and Native American literatures. Authors under study may include Tan, Kingston (Asian-American), Said (Arab-American), Rodriguez, Anzaldua (Latino-American), Erdrich, Silko (Native American). 
         ENG 4750   Studies in Literature 4 cr.  Topics in literature vary on a semester basis. Seminar is required of English majors but is open to all students. 
         ESS 3030   Oceans: Our Continuing Frontier 4 cr.  Introduction to the whole range of human involvement with the sea, emphasizing awareness of and possible solutions to technological problems inherent in exploring the sea. Interdisciplinary course designed for General Science, Integrated Science, and non-science majors. 
         ESS 3260   Meteorology 4 cr.  Introduction to the fundamentals of weather and climate: understanding of the various atmospheric phenomena that interact to produce daily weather occurrences and global climate patterns; meteorological phenomena, and issues involving hurricanes, tornadoes, thunderstorms, floods, ozone depletion, potential global warming, and growing environmental concerns. Laboratory exercises directed to extracting and analyzing data from the Madonna weather station and also performing lab exercises related to the above topics. 
         ESS 3290   Principles of Astronomy 4 cr.  Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course. Interdisciplinary course designed for non-science majors and for majors in General and Integrated Science. 
         FCS 3750   Human Shelter & Environment (FCS*/MM) 4 cr.  Emphasis on the impact of design and environment on individuals and families. Environments are studied as they relate to social, psychological, economic, and legislative conditions in society. Interior design fundamentals and the impact of the designed environment on human behavior. Space planning, furnishing, and selection of materials and components for interiors. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour academic service learning component.) 
         FCS 4530   Teaching Personal Development & Career Planning 3 cr.  Introductory course in the career development process. Students participate in an interactive learning experience that involves self-discovery, career investigations and planning, and the use of technological and community resources. An externship in an individual’s pathway of choice is required. 
         FIN 3150   Business Finance 3 cr.  Study of the management of the financial affairs of a business enterprise in respect to planning and analysis of the financial decision making function. Topics include: time value of money, working capital management, leverage, ratio analysis, capital budgeting, capital structure decisions, dividend policy, and international financial management. Prerequisites: ACC 2020and ECN 2730. 
         FIN 3700   Life Cycle Financial Planning (FCS/FIN*) 3 cr.  Basic planning of personal finances to satisfy personal and family life cycle goals. Topics include: budgeting, consumer credit, investments, insurance, personal residences and real estate, retirement plans, and individual income taxes. The life cycle of personal investment strategies is explored. 
         FS  3280    
         FS  3500   Hydraulics & Water Supply (FS*/OSH) 3 cr.  Principles of hydraulics theory, grading of water supplies, water supply adequacy testing procedures, and computation of velocity friction loss related to tactical decision making. Prerequisites: PHY 2530 and 2540. 
         FS  3680   Fire Protection Systems I (FS*/OSH) 3 cr.  Survey of sprinkler systems covering design details, placement, inspection, and maintenance; practical application of current codes and standards for system utilizations. Prerequisite: MTH1050 or its equivalent. 
         FS  3690   Fire Protection Systems II (FS*/OSH) 3 cr.  Principles of use and design characteristics of special fire protection systems; halons, CO2, dry chemical foam, and alarm and detection systems. Prerequisite: MTH 1050 or its equivalent. 
         FS  4280    
         FS  4400   Tactics & Strategy (FS*/OSH) 3 cr.  Study and evaluation of various methods and techniques employed in fire suppression. Includes preplanning and analysis of emergency situations with emphasis on individual decision-making, the effective use of equipment, apparatus, and manpower. 
         FS  4900   Fire Service Management (FS*/OSH) 3 cr.  Principles of management and organization in fire protection. Includes analysis of an organization as to its administrative, leadership, and management style in fire protection. 
         GEO 3010   World Regional Geography 4 cr.  Regional study of the earth’s realms; cultural and physical factors affecting people; effect of the demographic and industrial revolutions of the world. 
         GER 3020    
         GER 3060   Community Resources 1 cr.  Focus on the identification and scope of current and potential resources and programs for older adults. 
         GER 3070    
         GER 3100   Activity in Aging 3 cr.  An analysis of concepts, theories, and programming related to the role activity plays in successful aging. Topics include the meaning of activity, standards of practice, current modalities, multiple strategies, resource utilization, leadership styles, and motivation. 
         GER 3150   Physical Aspects of Aging 3 cr.  Study of the normal, as well as the pathological, changes occurring in the aging human body with special emphasis on age-related chronic diseases. 
         GER 3460   Addressing Behavior Changes in Dementia (GER*/PSY) 2 cr.  Explores the causes of challenging behaviors in people with dementia and discusses strategies for addressing these behaviors. Prerequisite: GER 2010. 
         GER 3500   Mental Health & the Older Adult 3 cr.  Basic engagement skills for working with older adults. Information and interventions related to common mental health issues in older people. Practice in empathic listening, basic interviewing, and problem-solving skills. Symptoms of some common mental health problems and strategies to obtain help for older individuals with those problems. 
         GER 3700   Legal Issues for Older Adults 3 cr.  An overview of legal issues typically encountered by people in their later years with emphasis on laws and policies affecting management of their care, substitute decision making, public benefits, and medical treatment issues. 
         GER 3850   Documentation & Assessment 3 cr.  An overview of documentation and assessment in the field of human services with a strong emphasis on the practice of gerontology. Content includes the biopsychosocial assessment, behaviorally- specific care planning, care management, care path design, and other documentation required in settings that serve older adults. 
         GER 3900   Care Management for Older Adults 3 cr.  The theory and practice of care management. Content includes the five core functions, development of comprehensive care plans, monitoring of the client’s progress toward achieving intervention goals, and discussion of ethical practice standards. The role of diversity, client rights, and professional values in the practice of care management also addressed. 
         GER 4140    
         GER 4150   Social Gerontology (GER*/SOC) 2 cr.  Focus on the impact of aging upon the individual and society. An examination of attitudes, concepts, theoretical perspectives, and issues of an aging culture. 
         GER 4250   Public Policy & Resources in Aging 2 cr.  Examination of public policies, legislation, and resources related to older people. Focus on the role of gerontology professionals in policy decision-making and the role of ethics. Analysis of structure and functions of service delivery systems and organizations. 
         GER 4850   Gerontology Management 3 cr.  Examination of gerontology management techniques. Focus on basic principles of management as they relate to human services. 
         GER 4870   Nursing Home Administration I 3 cr.  An overview of health, administrative, and leadership concerns in a nursing home. Topics include: Federal and State regulations in relation to dietetics, health policy and leadership, pharmacology, infection control, nursing, quality assurance, and accounting and budgeting. 
         GER 4880   Nursing Home Administration II 3 cr.  An overview of health, administrative, and leadership concerns in a nursing home. Topics include: Federal and State regulations in relation to life safety code, social services and activity therapy, physical plant, and occupational safety and health; normal aging; insurances; and the legal environment of a licensed nursing home. 
         HIS 3220   Race, Ethnicity, & Class in American Life (HIS*/SOC) 4 cr.  Survey of historical and contemporary expressions, patterns, and consequences of intergroup tensions stemming from discrimination in American Life. 
         HIS 3300   Early Modern World 4 cr.  World history in the period of European global expansion from the formation of the Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Sixteenth Century to the end of the Napoleonic Wars, including a study of politics, culture, ideas, and religion of Europe and the World. 
         HIS 3330   Modern World 4 cr.  World history from 1789 C.E. to the present, including a study of modern global culture realms. Special attention is given to global crises and achievements, the Cold War and its aftermath, and global political and economic development. 
         HIS 3410   Minority Groups in America 4 cr.  Conflict between the revolutionary ideals of the American dream and the reality of majority-minority group relations from colonial America to the present. 
         HIS 3810   American Civil Rights Movement 3 cr.  Study of the American Civil Rights Movement for African-Americans from the Second World War until the present. Various strategies for achieving social change are examined and assessed, with due attention to the complementary roles of leaders and of ordinary Americans. Emphasis on the powerful and defining influences of religion and law in American responses to the value dilemmas related to social justice and social change. 
         HIS 4100   Special Problems in History 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Study of selected topics of interest in History. 
         HIS 4320   Foreign Policy History of the United States 3 cr.  Influence of foreign policy on past and present life of the United States; emphasis on the nation as a world power, taking into account the viewpoints of the international community of nations. 
         HIS 4510   Economic & Business History of the United States (ECN/HIS*) 4 cr.  Survey of major changes in the American economy, including transportation, industry, labor, finance, and marketing. Role of private business and government in economic change. 
         HIS 4530   United States in the Modern Era 4 cr.  Development of the United States as a world power and its impact on the social, economic, cultural, and political changes in the contemporary era. 
         HIS 4631   Global Studies: Modern Africa (HIS*/PSC) 3 cr.  Study of selected historical problems and themes related to modern sub-Saharan Africa, with attention to relationships with the non-African world. 
         HIS 4632   Global Studies: Modern Asia (HIS*/PSC) 3 cr.  Study of selected historical problems and themes related to modern Asia, with an emphasis on China, Japan, and India, and attention to domestic developments and global relationships. 
         HIS 4633   Global Studies: Modern Latin America (HIS*/PSC) 3 cr.  Study of selected historical problems and themes related to modern Latin America, with attention to regional and global relationships. 
         HIS 4634   Global Studies: Modern Middle East (HIS*/PSC) 3 cr.  Study of selected historical problems and themes related to the modern Middle East, with an emphasis on Arab and Islamic cultures, attention to the non-Arab and non-Islamic dimensions of the region and to global relationships. 
         HIS 4810   American Civil War 4 cr.  Examination of the American Civil War, the pivotal event in the American experience, emphasis on the causes of the Civil War, the course of the War from several angles, and an overview of Reconstruction. 
         HMG 3360   Lodging Management I (HMG*/MGT/NFS) 3 cr.  A study in general responsibilities of various departments within the rooms, the food and beverage, the marketing and sales, and the administrative divisions of a lodging property. Prerequisite: MGT 2360. 
         HMG 3660   Market Field Study (HMG*/NFS) 2 cr.  Three day on-site visit to a hospitality market and trade show where hospitality industry leaders offer valuable current educational sessions; and to hotels, restaurants, and private clubs in the same city that provide an inside look at the operation of selected hospitality venues. 
         HMG 4260   Club Management (HMG*/MGT/SM) 3 cr.  General administrative procedures in the management of private clubs. Study and analysis of club operations, club boards of directors, service excellence in clubs, leadership in club operations, quality management systems for clubs, club marketing, food and beverage operation in clubs, financial management, and fundamental features of specific categories of private clubs. Prerequisites: MGT 2360, CIS2250 or2380. 
         HMG 4360   Lodging Management II (HMG*/MGT/NFS) 2 cr.  A study of various organizational structures and systems in the lodging industry and the authority vested in the respective levels of management. Emphasis on operations analysis and problem solving. Prerequisites: HMG 3360 and MGT 2360. 
         HMG 4370   Marketing Hospitality Services (HMG*/MKT) 3 cr.  An in-depth look at the nature and scope of the meetings, convention and trade show markets, how to effectively service this market, and increase market share for properties. Prerequisite MKT 2440. 
         HSP 3310   Management of the Bereavement Process (EM/HSP*) 3 cr.  The foundations of the bereavement process following the loss of a significant person. An examination of stage theories and key concepts that describe the grief continuum and personal transformation through the process of grief. Cultural attitudes and myths regarding loss and bereavement are examined in the context of gender, ethnicity, age, and circumstances of death. Personal reflections on loss and bereavement are encouraged throughout. 
         HSP 3480   Psychosocial Domains of Palliative/ End-of-Life Care (HSP*/PSY) 3 cr.  Exploration of the psychosocial domains of assessment across the life span of individuals and families in palliative/End-of-Life (EOL) care. Developing strategies for facilitating holistic care to patients and families. Effective communication skills for cultural competence. The impact of stress on the quality of life for the patient, family, and transdisciplinary team. 
         HSP 3500   Spiritual & Ethical Considerations Palliative/EndofLife Care(HSP*/RST) 3 cr.  Examines dying as potentially the last stage of human development and spiritual growth. Enhances religious literacy through identification of the salient beliefs and practices regarding illness, dying, death, and burial rituals of major world religions. Ethical theories, principles, and steps that guide decision making for individuals, families, and caregivers in Palliative/End-of-Life (EOL) care. 
         HSP 3530   Palliative/End-of-Life Comfort and Care 3 cr.  Instruction in the physical aspects of therapeutic interventions to relieve the distress of common problems associated with disease process, emphasis on ways to control pain and manage other symptoms associated with dying, provides for practicing selected comfort measures in a simulated laboratory setting. 
         HSP 4620   Palliative/End-of-Life Care Management I 3 cr.  Focus on the general functions of a manager and application of these functions to hospice settings. Examines the history of hospice management as well as theories of motivation and leadership. Emphasis on leadership and development and understanding organizational behavior. 
         HSP 4650   Hospice/Palliative Care Field Experience I 3 cr.  Application of introductory concepts in palliative/end-of-life (EOL) care. Includes observation and experience with the delivery of palliative/EOL care in a hospice organization. Consists of 15 hours of seminar and 90 hours of practicum in selected agencies. Prerequisite: approval of Hospice advisor. 
         HSP 4750   Emerging Issues in Palliative/ End-of-Life Care 3 cr.  Current issues and emerging trends within the Palliative/End-of-Life (EOL) care continuum. Examination of access and barriers to EOL care and the role of healthcare leaders, policy makers, and key stakeholders in developing strategies for delivery of timely quality care and financing mechanisms. Exploration of beliefs, values, and practices that shape decision making regarding dying, death, and burial rituals. 
         HSP 4820   Palliative/End-of-Life Care Management II 3 cr.  Focus on advanced management functions and application of these functions to various hospice settings. Explores fiscal management, marketing, public relations, strategic planning, human resource management, funding sources, legal issues, and quality assurance. Prerequisite: HSP 4620. 
         HUM 3050   The Idea of Justice (HUM*/RST) 4 cr.  An interdisciplinary study of justice based on an analysis of humanities texts from a variety of discourse communities in order to develop an appreciation of diverse concepts and expressions of justice. 
         HUM 3080   Nature and Scope of Inquiry 3 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Theme-based, highly interactive interdisciplinary course designed to enable students to explore the different approaches and ways of knowing that contribute to understanding and resolving complex issues, problems, or dilemmas of contemporary life. The course focuses on a compelling theme and is designed to develop the commitment to intellectual inquiry, humanistic values, and service to others as embodied in the mission of the University. 
         HUM 3090   Holocaust: Issues & Themes in the Genocide of European Jewry 4 cr.  Examination of the social and political forces and actions that enabled the Nazi regime to plan and carry out the systematic extermination of European Jewry. Analysis of the Nazi genocidal agenda, utilizing materials from history, literature, film, music, and the fine arts. An overview of the roots of anti-Semitism and of how a modern authoritarian regime employed historic stereotypes and prejudices in effectively enlisting a majority of its citizens in active or passive criminal complicity. Examination of the institutions of mass murder, the silence of church and state, and, despite this silence, the forces of resistance. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. 
         INB 3140   International Business 3 cr.  Foundational knowledge of the current forces influencing the conduct of international business, including cultural, political, legal, and economic forces. Exploration of market entry strategies, trade and trade agreements, international monetary system, business finance, and organizational design and management considerations. 
         INB 4350   International Trade Structures & Systems 3 cr.  An examination of current theories and patterns of international trade and finance, including an exploration of the history, institutional framework, and structural patterns of international trade, and an analysis of exchange rate determination theories and balance of payment drivers. Prerequisites: ECN 2720, ECN 2730, and INB 3140. 
         INB 4500   International Business & Culture Experience 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Students work with an advisor to select a country of travel, establish learning objectives, and develop guidelines to write a paper. 
         INB 4710   Brunch with an Expert Seminar 1 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         INB 4720   Literature Review Seminar 3 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         INB 4730   Research Seminar 3 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         INB 4740   General Topic Seminar 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         INB 4750   Leadership Seminar 1 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         JPN 3210   Survey of Japan 3 cr.  Introduction to Japanese history, religion, culture, geography, statecraft, and social institutions, using a historical-chronological approach to how the distinctive attitudes of the Japanese have emerged and changed over time. Particular examination of the arts as an eloquent record of Japanese culture and Japanese definitions of themselves and their vision of life. Course taught in English. 
         JPN 4230   Japanese Literature in Translation 3 cr.  A survey of Japanese literature from antiquity to the present, emphasizing the development of Japanese culture and civilization and the distinctive themes, values, ideals, and literary forms of various periods with special attention to the relationship between literature and the performing arts in Japan. Works are read in translation. 
         JRN 3130   Photography I (ART/JRN*) 3 cr.  Basic digital photography; principles of light, lenses, and composition; participation in all phases of digital work flow from initial composition to final image. Required for students seeking teaching certification with a Journalism minor. 
         JRN 3140   Photography II (ART/JRN*) 3 cr.  Further exploration of photography including digital and chemical-based imaging. Digital and chemical printing, negative development, archival and fine art black-and-white printing. Class culminates with a portfolio project in either print or digital media. Prerequisite JRN 3130 or permission of instructor. 
         JRN 3160   News Production 2 cr.  Techniques and hands-on experience of covering beats, digging out stories, writing stories, and validating facts under pressure of deadlines through working on the school publication. Prerequisite: JRN 1320 and 2860; or departmental approval. 
         JRN 3570   Editing and Design 3 cr.  Principles of editing, headline writing, page design, use of graphics in print and digital publications. May include an academic service-learning experience. Prerequisite: JRN 1320 or departmental approval. 
         JRN 4010   Mass Communication (BCA/COM/JRN*) 3 cr.  Theory of behavior in communications in general and the mass media in particular. The design and evaluation of public opinion studies and research topics in communications with emphasis on the effects that the various media have had on consumers. Required for students seeking teaching certification with a Journalism and Public Relations minor. 
         JRN 4050   Advanced Public Relations 3 cr.  Development of a variety of public relations projects for internal and external audiences, including publicity generation, media relations, on-line and print publication creation, press releases, media kits, and crisis communication. Discussion of public relations strategies and tactics, case studies, and ethical decision-making. Prerequisite: JRN 2050or departmental approval. 
         JRN 4160   Advanced News Production 2 cr.  Writing opinion pieces; selecting stories and graphics; composing cpations and headlines; designing print and online pages within constraints of news hole and budget; editing the school publication under actual deadline conditions. Prerequisite: JRN 1320, 3160, and 3570; or departmental approval. 
         JRN 4750   Spec Topics:Creating an Interactive & Engaging Instagram (COM/JRN*) 1 cr.   
         LAW 3210   Legal Research & Writing II 3 cr.  Further development of research and writing skills, including analyzing a fact situation and following the evolution of a typical lawsuit. Emphasis on Federal law. Prerequisite: LAW 1010,2570 
         LAW 3450   Business Associations 3 cr.  Pre-incorporation and incorporation procedures, directors’ meetings, stockholders’ meetings, public sales of securities, foreign jurisdictions, amending Articles of Incorporation and By-laws, partnership agreements, and dissolution. 
         LAW 3560   Intellectual Property 3 cr.  An overview of the law of patents, trademarks, and copyrights. Focus is on the unique intellectual property problems facing inventors, writers, musicians, and artists. Prerequisite: LAW 1010 
         LAW 3860   Probate Estates 3 cr.  Probate administration; Michigan Probate Code; gift taxes; decedents’ estates, including determination of assets, federal and state death returns; fiduciary income tax returns; transfer of securities; closing documents. 
         LAW 3870   Will & Trust Drafting 2 cr.  An introduction to the items to be considered in drafting wills and trusts. Inter vivos and testamentary trusts are introduced. Role playing for the initial client interview. Students draft a sample will and participate in a will contest mock trial. Prerequisite: LAW 1010. 
         LAW 4100   Special Problems in Law 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Study of selected areas of paralegal practice on a seminar basis. 
         LAW 4220   Torts: An Overview of Negligence 3 cr.  The fundamentals of tort law with emphasis on application to fact situations encountered in legal practice. Areas covered are intentional interferences and defenses, negligence and defenses, strict liability, product liability, misrepresentation, defamation, wrongful death, medical malpractice, and auto negligence. 
         LAW 4230   Medical-Legal Concepts & Medical Records 3 cr.  Practical applications of legal concepts to medical-legal records. Medical terminology and review of medical records is covered. 
         LAW 4270   Evidence 3 cr.  Practical use of evidentiary rules in terms of case development and the trial process, including pre-trial discovery plans, trial preparation, and trial assistance. 
         LAW 4560   Case Preparation & Trial 3 cr.  An advanced course in the litigation process. An actual case is developed for trial presentation. Drafting of opening statements, closing statements, and jury instructions are covered. Prerequisite: LAW 1010. 
         LAW 4580   Alternative Dispute Resolution 3 cr.  An advanced course in the pre-trial litigation process which involves pretrial settlement of lawsuits through facilitated settlement, including such methods as: self-help, agency intervention, arbitration, mediation, negotiation, mini-trials, summary jury trials, and court-ordered ADR. Investigation into a career as a mediator is addressed. Prerequisite: LAW 1010; pre- or corequisite: LAW 2570. 
         MGT 3020   Organizational Behavior 3 cr.  Analysis of group and individual behavior in the organization; analysis of social structures which affect management policies and procedures. Prerequisite: MGT 2360. 
         MGT 3100   Strategic Human Resources Planning 3 cr.  Analysis of personnel functions, job and manpower requirements, techniques for recruitment and hiring, job analysis techniques; compensation process; collective bargaining process. Prerequisite: MGT 2360. 
         MGT 3160   Human Behavior & Leadership 2 cr.  Leadership and its relationship to theory, style, time management, problem solving, personal power, team building, and self assessment. Self-assessment instruments, discussion, films, case studies, in-basket exercise, leaderless group problem-solving exercises, peer interview, assessments, and team development are integrated to provide a better understanding of leadership and of human behavior as it relates to leadership. 
         MGT 3210   Operations Management 3 cr.  A study of the organizational operations responsible for products, services, tasks and processes. Manufacturing and service operations are studied as linked, cross-functional, integrated, aimed at customer requirements, and designed to minimize waste. Prerequisites: CIS 2380, MGT 2360, MTH 2350, and QS 3550. 
         MGT 3270   Human Resources Training & Development 3 cr.  Processes involved in retaining and developing the human resources of any organization; includes learning theory and its pathing and consulting techniques. Prerequisite: MGT 3020. 
         MGT 3690   Entrepreneurship 3 cr.  A study of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial spirit in business and the financial, organizational, and personal influences which combine to create a flow of new ideas, new markets, new products, and new technology. Applications of business research techniques for assisting local business owners and operators in analyzing their operations and practices. Prerequisites: ACC 2010, MGT2360, and MKT2440. 
         MGT 3750    
         MGT 4300   Strategic Planning in an e-Commerce Environment 3 cr.  Capstone in the e-Commerce Certificate: applying research of strategic management and the management of information technologies to develop an integrated framework for analyzing how the Internet can be used to measure organizational performance in the various functional areas of business. Case studies apply the principles of e-Commerce. Prerequisites: one course each in accounting, management, management information systems, marketing, and economics; and BUS 3530. 
         MGT 4350   Compensation 3 cr.  The development, validation, and implementation issues associated with a wage-and-salary program. Topics include: market position, pay range development and validation, market surveying, and implementation techniques and issues. The technical, legal, and moral issues involved in fringe benefit planning, implementation, and administration. Prerequisites: FIN 3150, QS 3550. 
         MGT 4400   National Labor Relations Policy & Practice 3 cr.  Survey of the contemporary policy and practice of private and pubic sector employers with respect to their employees. Exposure to a myriad of situations facing contemporary leaders and examination and discussion of the ramifications of various decisions on organizational effectiveness and efficiency, as well as society at large. 
         MGT 4710   Brunch with an Expert Seminar 1 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MGT 4720   Literature Review Seminar 3 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MGT 4730   Research Seminar 3 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MGT 4740   General Topic Seminar 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MGT 4750   Leadership Seminar 1 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MKT 3070   Promotional Strategy 3 cr.  A study of key promotional tools of advertising, public relations, sales, and sales promotion. Major emphasis on identifying the factors that become the basis of managerial strategy which determine promotional decisions. Prerequisites: MKT 2440 and MKT 2550. 
         MKT 3100   Professional Selling 3 cr.  The study and application of professional selling theory and technique as they relate to marketing communication. Other topics include types of selling situations, customer relationship management, teleselling, customer service, ethical issues of selling and sales management. Prerequisite: MKT 2440. 
         MKT 3660   Business Marketing 3 cr.  A study of business marketing as a specialization. Examines characteristics of the industrial marketplace and emphasizes key differences from the consumer goods marketplace. Topics include: value analysis, current market analysis, marketing mix management techniques, how business organizations buy, product development, pricing, competitive bidding and control of costs, and developing and evaluating business marketing strategies. Prerequisites: ACC 2010, MGT 2360 and MKT 3070. 
         MKT 3730   Principles of Advertising 3 cr.  Intended for students with career plans in advertising and related fields. Emphasis on application of theory and strategies. Students develop and apply marketing and creative skills in analyzing advertising problems and preparing advertisement concepts for consumer and business marketing. Examination of the strategic, practical, and ethical dimensions of advertising through applications. 
         MKT 3870   Sales Management 3 cr.  Introduction to organization and direction of sales programs, involving personal selling activities and integration of sales efforts with other marketing elements of the firm, implementation of sales programs, selection of appropriate sales personnel, designing and implementing sales policies and procedures, evaluation and control of sales force performance. Prerequisites: MKT 2440 and MGT 2360. 
         MKT 4560   Marketing Management 3 cr.  A study of the overall marketing strategy pertaining to problems experienced in today’s economy, utilizing a case study method. Emphasis on physical distribution, cost analysis, and effective pricing. Prerequisites: QS 4230, minimum of 12 cr. in marketing, and senior standing. 
         MKT 4710   Brunch with an Expert Seminar 1 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MKT 4720   Literature Review Seminar 3 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MKT 4730   Research Seminar 3 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MKT 4740   General Topics Seminar 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  The study and application of professional selling theory and technique as they relate to marketing communication. Other topics include types of selling situations, customer relationship management, teleselling, customer service, ethical issues of selling and sales management. 
         MKT 4750   Leadership Seminar 1 cr.  Prerequisites for all seminars: Junior level or full-time work experience. Students are limited to a total of 4 cr.. of seminars. 
         MM  3010   Specialty Merchandising (MKT/MM*) 3 cr.  Study of the merchandising of specialty goods and services Specific techniques of merchandising specialty goods are analyzed from the retailer’s point of view. Characteristics of specialty goods and consumer buying habits are studied. Prerequisite: MM 2400. 
         MM  3050   Textiles for Consumers (FCS/MM*) 3 cr.  Study of the basic principles and recent developments in the textile industry consumer products arena. Properties of natural and synthetic fibers, yarn, fabric structures, and finishes related to the consumer’s end use, performance requirements, and care. Analysis of consumer textile legislation, identification, and labeling are covered. Prerequisite: MM 1090 
         MM  3080   Visual Merchandising (MKT/MM*) 3 cr.  Study of the various facets of visual merchandising, encompassing retail merchandise presentation, displays, store planning, signage, lighting, and fixtures. Discussion of the merchandising and design criteria for point-of-purchase, exhibits, and special promotions. The merchandising and design aspects emphasized. 
         MM  3310   History of Costume 3 cr.  Study of dress and accessories from ancient times to present day; emphasis on aesthetic, social, political, and economic influences; influence of recurring styles on present fashion. 
         MM  3480   Retail Buying (MKT/MM*) 3 cr.  Merchandising functions of retail buying with emphasis on the varied techniques used for planning, executing, and evaluating merchandise. Prerequisites: CIS 2250 or 2380, MGT 2360, MKT 2440 
         MM  3500   Electronic Retailing (MKT/MM*) 2 cr.  Investigates the growing world of the cyber store and the scope of on-line retailing. Examination of the different types of e-tailers: traditional "bricks and mortar" store web sites, shopping service “malls” accessed through Internet service providers, and large-scale online auction and off-price retail sites. Goods and service e-tailors, both profit and non-profit, are analyzed. E-tail web consumers and their buying patterns are examined. 
         MM  3630   Architectural Style & Interior Design (FCS/HMG/MM*) 4 cr.  Basic principles of design and color related to lodging interiors and exteriors; emphasis on planning, selecting, and furnishing environments for both commercial and consumer needs. 
         MM  3650   Market Field Study 2 cr.  An in-depth study of a wholesale market district emphasizing history, creation, production, and distribution of consumer goods. On site visit for a three-to-five day period. Prerequisites: MM 1090 and MM 2400. 
         MM  4300   Theories & Practices Merchandising 2 cr.  Applications of merchandising planning concepts utilizing computer systems. Development of processing tasks using merchandising case studies. Simulation problem solving. Prerequisites: MM3480, CIS 2380. 
         MM  4450   Retail Management 2 cr.  Study of the role of the retail manager, with examination of selected current topical issues. Review of budgetary standards and techniques used for strategic planning. Emphasis placed on critical analysis and decision making. Prerequisites: MM 2400, MGT 2360. 
         MTE 3050   Clinical Hematology 4 cr.  Introduction to clinical hematology with emphasis on identification and classification of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets in human disease. Focus on normal, leukemic conditions and general hematopoiesis. Prerequisite: CHM 3610 and admission to 3000-level MTE courses. 
         MTE 3070   Immunohematology & Serology 4 cr.  Immunologic principles and practice of blood transfusion science for the medical technologist. Laboratory practice in antigen identification, antibody detection, cross-matching, and procedures aimed at diagnosis and treatment of hemolytic disorders. Prerequisite: admission to Biomedical Sciences; prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 3280. 
         MTE 3090   Hemostasis, Urinalysis & Body Fluids 4 cr.  A study of molecular interactions involving cells, vessel walls, and biochemicals in promotion of balance between procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity. Screening and differential diagnosis of primary and secondary disorders of hemostasis. Overview of molecular diagnostics in renal and body fluid anomalies and their clinical correlates. Laboratory exercises in component and special procedures. Prerequisite: admission to Biomedical Sciences. 
         MUAP2610   Lyric Theater 1 cr.  The study and public performance of staged productions from the operatic, light opera, and Broadway genres. Open to all students and community members. 
         MUAP3150   Voice 2 cr.  Voice placement; vocalization for tone production, intonation, breath control, relaxation, resonance, vowel formation, and study of the consonants; simple songs with English diction suitable to acquired technique; introduction to the Art Song: Italian Art Song, selected arias. 
         MUAP3160   Voice 2 cr.  Voice placement; vocalization for tone production, intonation, breath control, relaxation, resonance, vowel formation, and study of the consonants; simple songs with English diction suitable to acquired technique; introduction to the Art Song: Italian Art Song, selected arias. 
         MUAP3210   Piano 2 cr.  Study of keyboard theory, techniques and repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP3220   Piano 2 cr.  Study of keyboard theory, techniques and repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP3240   Organ 2 cr.  Organ technique; application to basic materials; congregational accompaniment; repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP3250   Organ 2 cr.  Organ technique; application to basic materials; congregational accompaniment; repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP3260   Violin 2 cr.   
         MUAP3270   Violin 2 cr.   
         MUAP3280   Guitar 2 cr.   
         MUAP3290   Guitar 2 cr.   
         MUAP3310   Flute 2 cr.   
         MUAP3320   Flute 2 cr.   
         MUAP3360   Saxophone 2 cr.   
         MUAP3370   Saxophone 2 cr.   
         MUAP3410   Clarinet 2 cr.   
         MUAP3420   Clarinet 2 cr.   
         MUAP3430   Viola 2 cr.   
         MUAP3440   Viola 2 cr.   
         MUAP3450   Cello 2 cr.   
         MUAP3460   Cello 2 cr.   
         MUAP3470   Harp 2 cr.   
         MUAP3480   Harp 2 cr.   
         MUAP3510   Trumpet 2 cr.   
         MUAP3520   Trumpet 2 cr.   
         MUAP3620   Ensemble: Instrumental Chamber Music 1 cr.  Study and performance of duos, trios, quartets and other combinations; open to all students by audition. 
         MUAP3720   Orchestra/Band 1 cr.  Rehearsal, membership, and performance in an orchestra, band, or jazz ensemble; open to all students by audition. 
         MUAP4150   Voice 2 cr.  Voice placement; vocalization for tone production, intonation, breath control, relaxation, resonance, vowel formation, and study of the consonants; simple songs with English diction suitable to acquired technique; introduction to the Art Song: Italian Art Song, selected arias. 
         MUAP4160   Voice 2 cr.  Voice placement; vocalization for tone production, intonation, breath control, relaxation, resonance, vowel formation, and study of the consonants; simple songs with English diction suitable to acquired technique; introduction to the Art Song: Italian Art Song, selected arias. 
         MUAP4210   Piano 2 cr.  Study of keyboard theory, techniques and repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP4220   Piano 2 cr.  Study of keyboard theory, techniques and repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP4240   Organ 2 cr.  Organ technique; application to basic materials; congregational accompaniment; repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP4250   Organ 2 cr.  Organ technique; application to basic materials; congregational accompaniment; repertoire designed to meet needs of individual students. 
         MUAP4260   Violin 2 cr.   
         MUAP4270   Violin 2 cr.   
         MUAP4280   Guitar 2 cr.   
         MUAP4290   Guitar 2 cr.   
         MUAP4310   Flute 2 cr.   
         MUAP4320   Flute 2 cr.   
         MUAP4360   Saxophone 2 cr.   
         MUAP4370   Saxophone 2 cr.   
         MUAP4410   Clarinet 2 cr.   
         MUAP4420   Clarinet 2 cr.   
         MUAP4430   Viola 2 cr.   
         MUAP4440   Viola 2 cr.   
         MUAP4450   Cello 2 cr.   
         MUAP4460   Cello 2 cr.   
         MUAP4470   Harp 2 cr.   
         MUAP4480   Harp 2 cr.   
         MUAP4510   Trumpet 2 cr.   
         MUAP4520   Trumpet 2 cr.   
         MUS 3090   Music for the Classroom Teacher (EDU/MUS*) 2 cr.  Development of the basic knowledge of the melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic elements of music; introductory experiences in reading and playing music using the autoharp, guitar, piano, and recorder. The course is particularly designed for but not limited to, the elementary school teacher. Prerequisite: EDU 2000. 
         MUS 3100    
         MUS 3330   History of Music Literature I 3 cr.  Development of music from pre-Christian beginnings through the Baroque period with emphasis on music form, style, literature, and composers. 
         MUS 3340   History of Music Literature II 3 cr.  Development of music from the Classical period to the present with emphasis on musical form, style, literature, and composers. 
         MUS 3540   Piano Pedagogy I 2 cr.  Intensive study of methods and materials in piano teaching as applied to beginning and intermediate students. 
         MUS 3550   Piano Pedagogy II 2 cr.  Continuation of MUS 3540 as applied to the advanced student. 
         MUS 3630   Strings Pedagogy 2 cr.  Group study of strings; technical differences, capabilities, peculiarities, ranges, bowings, etc., sufficient to teach beginning students effectively in groups. Designed for the middle and secondary school teacher. 
         MUS 3650   Woodwinds Pedagogy 2 cr.  Group study of winds: technical differences, capabilities, peculiarities, ranges, etc., sufficient to teach beginning students effectively in groups. Designed for the middle and secondary school teacher. 
         MUS 3660   Brass Pedagogy 1 cr.  Group study of brass: technical differences, capabilities, peculiarities, ranges, etc., sufficient to teach beginning students effectively in groups. Designed for the middle and secondary school teacher. 
         MUS 3670   Percussion Pedagogy 1 cr.  Group study of percussion: technical differences, capabilities, peculiarities, ranges, etc., sufficient to teach beginning students effectively in groups. Designed for the middle and secondary school teacher. 
         MUS 4010    
         MUS 4020   Contrapuntal Techniques 2 cr.  Aural and visual acquaintance with contrapuntal music of the 17th and 18th centuries; writing of music involving techniques characteristic of the period. 
         MUS 4030   Form & Analysis 2 cr.  Structural elements of musical composition as applied to form, from the simple song forms to the sonata-allegro form; melodic, harmonic, and structural analysis of representative works. 
         MUS 4040   Conducting & Performing Techniques 2 cr.  Integrated course with emphasis on baton technique, score reading, and arranging. Lecture 1 hour, laboratory 2 hours. 
         MUS 4070   Choral Techniques 2 cr.  Integrated course in development of choral tone, blend, balance, articulation and appropriate baton techniques, score preparation, style, and rehearsal procedures. 
         MUS 4170   Church Music (MUS*/RST) 2 cr.  The practice of church music in Catholic and Protestant traditions; a survey of music literature for liturgical purposes; principles of church music administration and program organization. 
         NFS 3220   Nutrition Assessment 2 cr.  An examination of the process of obtaining and interpreting nutritional data. Students will gain experience with medical documentation and explore appropriate uses for nutrition support. Pre-requisites BIO 2240 and NFS 2250. 
         NFS 3250   Medical Nutrition Therapy I 3 cr.  Physiological basis for modification of the normal diet as a preventive measure or therapeutic aid in certain diseases and disorders of the body. Prerequisites: BIO 2240 and NFS 3220. 
         NFS 3260   Advanced Food Science 3 cr.  Principles involved in food quality, spoilage and preservation, control of food borne illnesses. Managerial and manipulative techniques involved in formal demonstrations for teaching or promotional work. The experimental method applied in development and evaluation of selected food items. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIO 2260 or BIO 2270; CHM 1610 or 2210, NFS 2260. 
         NFS 3380   Nutrition Education and Counseling 3 cr.  Designing instructional units and materials for teaching nutrition and health principles to children and adults. Counseling theories, motivational interviewing, and behavior modification are covered. Prerequisite: NFS 2220 or NFS 2250. 
         NFS 3460   Food Service Management I (HMG/NFS*) 3 cr.  Purchasing standards, buying procedures, storage principles, and factors affecting quality, efficiency, and economy in quantity food production and service. Laboratory experience related to quantity food preparation and service. Safety and efficiency in the use and care of specialized equipment. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: MGT 2360, NFS 2260. 
         NFS 4250   Advanced Human Nutrition 4 cr.  Biochemical principles involved in the metabolism of specific nutrients. Problems in applying this knowledge to particular topics in nutrition. Prerequisites: CHM 1610 or CHM 3610; BIO 2240, NFS 2250. 
         NFS 4380   Community Nutrition 2 cr.  Social, economic, and political aspects of public health in relation to food and nutrition; problems and programs affecting vulnerable groups such as the poor, the aged, the handicapped, pregnant teenagers, infants. Lecture and supervised practice in community setting. Includes an academic service-learning experience. Prerequisite: NFS 2250. 
         NFS 4420   Medical Nutrition Therapy II 3 cr.  Examination of the interrelationships of physiology, biochemistry, and nutrition as related to medical nutritional therapy (MNT), including the scientific evidence supporting MNT. Emphasis on the role of MNT in preventing and treating disease/disorders. Coverage of the Nutrition Care Process and MNT of multiple disease states. Prerequisites: BIO 2240, NFS 3220. 
         NFS 4460   Food Service Management II (HMG/NFS*) 3 cr.  Principles of management applied to food service systems; physical facilities planning; sanitation and safety standards; organization and leadership; personnel management and cost control. Prerequisites: NFS 2260, MGT 2360. 
         NSC 3080   Nature and Scope of Inquiry 3 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Theme-based, highly interactive interdisciplinary course designed to enable students to explore the different approaches and ways of knowing that contribute to understanding and resolving complex issues, problems or dilemmas of contemporary life. Utilizing the different modes of inquiry which characterize the various disciplines, the course involves students in readings, discussions, works of art, lectures by experts, team collaboration, and independent research. The course focuses on a compelling theme and is designed to develop the commitment to intellectual inquiry, humanistic values, and service to others as embodied in the mission of the University. 
         NSC 3250   The Ascent of Man 4 cr.  Presentation of interrelationships of science and humanities throughout history. Discussion of the role of science and technology on the course of human events; course based on TV series. (For non-science majors.) 
         NSC 3730   Science Foundations I: Chemistry & Life Science (EDU/NSC*) 4 cr.  An introduction, for pre-service elementary teachers, to the basic concepts of matter: atoms, molecules, its changes, properties, and reactions. Plant and animal life, genetics, food cycle, changes in digestion, and ecosystems. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MTH 1040 or equivalent. (For non-science majors.) 
         NSC 3740   Science FoundationsII: EarthScience Physics & Astronomy (EDU/NSC*) 4 cr.  A continuation of basic science concepts for pre-service elementary teachers; study of the solar system, the earth’s structure, and the laws and forces which govern our planet and the universe as a whole. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MTH 1040 or equivalent. (For non-science majors.) 
         NUR 3010   Transitions in Professional Nursing 3 cr.  Designed to introduce the registered nurse (RN) to the foundations of baccalaureate nursing education. RNs focus on professional nursing roles within the context of complex practice settings across the care continuum. Exploration of concepts relevant to the contemporary healthcare system and skills necessary for academic and professional success. Prerequisites: Admission to the RN degree-completion program. 
         NUR 3040   Health Assessment for RNs 2 cr.  The comprehensive assessment of adult patients and the development of focused assessments as related to specific pathology, based on a holistic appraisal of the adult patient. Includes a supervised practicum. 
         NUR 3800   Health Promotion,Risk Reduction, & Disease Prevention 3 cr.  Focuses on the application of nursing strategies to enhance optimum wellness across the lifespan. Integrates health promotion, risk reduction, and disease prevention principles into the care of individuals and families across the care continuum. Prerequisite: Admission to the RN degree-completion program. 
         NUR 3950   Evidence-Based Nursing Practice 2 cr.  Provides the RN the opportunity to analyze the components of the research process and methodologies relative to nursing practice with an emphasis on the bridge between theory, nursing rearch, and clinical decision making. Prerequisite: MTH 2350; admission to the RN-BSN program. 
         NUR 4120   Issues in Gerontological Nursing & Palliative Care 3 cr.  Focuses on the care of older adults across the care continuum. Current theories are examined with an emphasis on the physical, psychological, legal, and social aspects of aging. Normal aging changes, common acute, chronic, and complex health problems, community resources, interdisciplinary team management, and quality of end of life care for older adults and their families are explored. Prerequisite: admission to the RN-BSN program. 
         NUR 4300   Population-Based Care 4 cr.  Focuses on the synthesis of community, public health and nursing principles and concepts as applied to the promotion and preserving of the health of populations. Attention given to the complexity of systems of care across the continuum through frames of increasingly culturally, ethnically and socially diverse populations. Environmental, epidemiological, social, economic, political, ethical/legal, disaster and global factors examined as influences on the health of aggregates. Utilizing the nursing process, population-based interventions are introduced. Prerequisite or co-requisite: NUR 3800; admission to the RN-BSN program. 
         OSH 3110   Industrial Safety & Health (FS/OSH*) 3 cr.  A study of numerous job-related safety and health hazards associated with a wide range of occupations in industrial work environments. 
         OSH 3210   Construction Safety 2 cr.  Study of factors in building structures and in use of tools and materials that cause accidents. Application of regulations and standards of Michigan Department of Labor - Construction Division. Development of safety awareness to prevent or reduce accidents on construction sites. 
         OSH 3220   Inspection & Survey of Facilities (FS/OSH*) 3 cr.  Safety and health hazards, both common and unique to various kinds of occupancies, including residential, industrial, and commercial. Includes surveying procedures, hazard recognition and evaluation, and the application of appropriate measures to assure maximum life and property safety. Prerequisite: OSH 2150 or consent of advisor. 
         OSH 3310   Safety Program Management 3 cr.  Examination of the organizational concepts of a safety program, with emphasis on organizational safety programs, objectives, responsibilities, and implementation; accident control and reports; motivation and incentives. 
         OSH 3520   Industrial Hygiene I 3 cr.  Familiarization with irritating or toxic substances and various occupational stress factors causing employee discomfort or illness; emphasis on sources and the control of environmental pollution, concepts of industrial hygiene; hazard evaluation, and elimination of related problems. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, BIO 2240 or 2430 and 2440 or NSC 1250. 
         OSH 3980   Industrial Hygiene II 3 cr.  Techniques of instrumentation and sampling. Hands-on training in use of instruments to measure and evaluate occupational health hazards by taking samples or surveying noise level, heat exposure, oxygen deficiency, combustible vapors, ventilation, as well as toxicology and radiation sources, along with protective measures to cope with hazards for their prevention and control. Prerequisites: OSH 3520,CHM1110,BIO2240or2430nd 2440or NSC 1250. 
         OSH 4300   Employee Occupational Health Maintenance & Medical Care Program 3 cr.  Study of drugs, smoking, alcohol, nutritional, and substance abuse in relationship to lost time, morale, accident frequency, and security. Medical care aspects deal with pre-employment, return to work, and work limitations as well as periodic physical re-examination; providing administrative and operational guidelines for designing and implementing a health maintenance program as well as emergency and pre-hospital medical care. 
         OSH 4510   Hazardous Materials I (EM/FS/OSH*) 3 cr.  Detailed knowledge for the emergency service professional: (a) identification, storage, handling, disposal, and identifying products of combustion of hazardous materials, including flammables, explosives, oxidizing, and corrosive materials ; (b) methods of contingency planning for hazardous materials incidents, culminating with the use of current software to conduct table top exercises to assist in planning, mitigating, and responding to hazardous materials emergencies. Prerequisite: CHM 1110 or equivalent. 
         OSH 4520   Hazardous Materials II (EM/FS/OSH*) 3 cr.  Preparation and certification at the technician level (40 hour) for emergency service professionals responding to hazardous materials incidents. Emphasis on the development of hazardous materials regulations, transportation placards, labels and markings, and hazard communication requirements. Prerequisite: EM 4510. 
         PED 3250   Motor Development 2 cr.  Survey of motor development as it relates to self expression and learning. Emphasis is placed on individual differences in physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Students learn strategies for developing and assessing children's motor skills. Safety issues are stressed. Prerequisites: PED 2000 and BIO 2240. 
         PED 3350   Adapted Physical Education 2 cr.  Survey of the philosophy and goals of adapted physical education, emphasizing the needs and characteristics of students with disabilities. Students develop the ability to plan, implement and evaluate a physical education program to meet the special needs of students with disabilities. Qualifications for special services and laws concerning special populations are also covered. Prerequisites: PED 2000 and BIO 2240. 
         PED 4500    
         PHL 3150   Existentialism 3 cr.  A study of the major themes of the philosophical approach of existential phenomenology which forms the intellectual foundation of much of modern thought and literature. (Recommended for students interested in art, music, and literary criticism.) 
         PHL 3210   Philosophy of Beauty 3 cr.  A philosophical analysis of the theories of beauty; meanings of art objects; the creative process; art as form, expression, symbol, imitation; art in relationship to truth and morals. (Recommended for students interested in art, music, and literary criticism.) 
         PHL 3310   Philosophy of Science 3 cr.  A study of the philosophy of science, reflecting on the philosophical presuppositions of modern scientific inquiry and a philosophical consideration of the nature of the world in which we live. (Recommended for students interested in science and math.) 
         PHL 3650   Philosophy of Knowledge 3 cr.  An examination of the philosophical problems connected with the questions of how human beings know what they know, and how they know whether that knowledge is true or not. (Recommended for students interested in psychology.) 
         PHL 4150   Philosophy of Religion (PHL*/RST) 3 cr.  Study of the relationship between philosophy and religion by highlighting philosophy’s role in the inquiry into the validity, value, and meaning of man’s concern with the existence and nature of the Ultimate Reality: God. (Recommended for students interested in the liberal arts.) 
         PHL 4230   Metaphysics (PHL*/RST) 3 cr.  The study, from a philosophical perspective, of the core issues of reality: the fundamental constituents of existence; the nature of God, truth, goodness, and the beautiful; with discussion of some of the solutions to metaphysical problems that have been proposed throughout the course of human history. Prerequisite: any other philosophy course or permission of the instructor. 
         PHY 3510   Modern Physics:  Atomic & Nuclear 4 cr.  Investigation of properties of atoms and the nucleus, the changes under the influence of relativity, and the impact of the quantum theory. Applications of instruments in studying nuclear reactions. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: PHY 2540 or PHY 2640 or departmental approval. 
         PHY 4510   Electronics: Digital Techniques 4 cr.  Number systems, digital codes, and Boolean algebra used in analysis of digital logic circuits; logic gates, encoding and decoding; Flip-flops, counters, registers and integrated circuits. Introduction to interfacing. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: PHY 2540 or PHY 2640 or equivalent; PHY 2710 recommended. 
         PSC 3210   Comparative Politics 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Comparative analysis of political phenomena, emphasizing the interplay of governmental institutions, social-economic-cultural configurations, and patterns of values and ideologies. 
         PSC 4510   State & Local Government 4 cr.  Analysis of state and local governments, local political forces, trends in metropolitan and suburban politics, problems in planning in an age of urbanization and governmental relations. 
         PSY 3010   Current Topics in Psychology 1 cr.  Reading and discussion of current research articles, focusing on topics in a different area of psychology each week. Topics change each time the course is offered, so it may be re-elected. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. 
         PSY 3130   Adolescent Psychology (FCS/PSY*) 4 cr.  Nature of pre-adolescent and adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics; systematic study of modern concepts for understanding and dealing with the adolescent and pre-adolescent in our society. Emphasis on normal behavior development as it relates to the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents. Prerequisite: PSY1010 
         PSY 3310    
         PSY 3320    
         PSY 3330   Psychological Issues in Child Abuse & Neglect 1 cr.  From a psychological perspective, examination of why child maltreatment occurs and who commits such acts, the short- and long-term effects of child abuse/neglect, the various treatment strategies employed with abused children and their abusers, and the broad legal and societal issues raised by this phenomenon. 
         PSY 3340   Self-Destructive Behavior in Adolescent Girls 1 cr.  The psychological bases for self-destructive behaviors in adolescent girls, including deliberate cutting of the skin, eating disorders, suicide and para-suicide, sexual promiscuity, gang membership, and substance abuse. Avenues for treatment and prevention also discussed. 
         PSY 3420   Abnormal Psychology 4 cr.  Nature of abnormal and deviant behavior and its underlying dynamics; systematic study of modern concepts of diagnosis, understanding, treatment and prevention of abnormal behavior patterns. Emphasis on normal behavior development as delineated by psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. 
         PSY 3490   Psychology of Traumatic Experiences (EM/PSY*) 1 cr.  The immediate and long term psychological effects of such traumatic events as abuse, accident, assault, crime, disaster, homicide, and suicide. The reactions of victims, witnesses, and survivors. Issues relevant to helping and healing in the aftermath of trauma are discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. 
         PSY 3520   Industrial/Organizational Psychology (BUS/PSY*) 3 cr.  Application of concepts, theories and methods from psychology to issues in the workplace. Topics include research methods, employee selection and assessment, performance appraisal, training and development, leadership. motivation, job satisfaction, job involvement, organizational structure, and organizatioinal change and development. Pre-requisite: PSY 1010 
         PSY 3720   Introduction to Clinical Psychology 3 cr.  An overview of current issues in the mental health field and an introduction to important skills needed by professionals in their day to day work. Students become familiar with diagnostic approaches, issues in psychological assessment, interviewing and clinical data gathering, types of psychological intervention, legal and ethical considerations, and how to recognize, understand and minimize psychologically inevitable gender and cultural biases often encountered in mental health settings. Prerequisite: PSY 3420. 
         PSY 3750   Mental Health Treatment Theories 3 cr.  An overview of current issues in the mental health field and an introduction to important skills needed by professionals in their day to day work. Students become familiar with diagnostic approaches, interviewing and clinical data gathering, types of psychological intervention, legal and ethical considerations, and how to recognize, understand and minimize psychologically inevitable gender and cultural biases often encountered in mental health settings. Prerequisite: PSY 3420. 
         PSY 3820   Forensic Psychology  (CJ/PSY*) 3 cr.  How the science of psychology is used by our legal system to better understand situations where an individual's state of mind or psychological functioning may have an impact on the legal process, the distinction between forensic and clinical work, conceptual underpinnings of forensic psychology, and the role of psychology in the legal system and controversies surrounding its use. Career paths and training issues also discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 1010 and PSY 3420. 
         PSY 4220   Theories of Personality 4 cr.  An overview of the major theories of personality, the role of personality theories in development, how various personality theories can be distinguished from one another, and an evaluation of these theories. Prerequisites: PSY 1010, junior or senior standing. 
         PSY 4300   Cognitive Psychology 4 cr.  All aspects of human thinking, including attention, perception, memory, knowledge, language, problem solving, creativity, decision making, and intelligence. Attention given to current research in areas such as mood-dependent memory, the power of suggestion in creating false memories, speed reading, and learning vocabulary, as well as the application of cognitive principles in everyday life. Course includes anon-line laboratory component in which students participate in a variety of experimental studies in various areas of cognitive psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. 
         PSY 4500   Behavioral Neuroscience (BIO/PSY*) 4 cr.  Scientific explanations of the neurobiological basis of behavior and evolution of the brain. Examination of nervous system structure and function; neuron biochemistry and neurotransmission; psychopharmacology; sensory and motor systems, physiological mechanisms influencing circadian rhythms, emotion, learning and memory, neurological disorders, psychological disorders, stress, and drug abuse. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. 
         QOM 3560   Teaming 3 cr.  To study the concepts and practice the skills for functioning and leading as family teams, cross-functional teams, task forces, and ad hoc teams for continuous improvement. Focus on goals, roles, communication, problem solving, decision making, planning, conflict management, innovation, and facilitating meetings. 
         QOM 3630   Materials & Purchasing Management 3 cr.  Relationship and coordination of purchasing to other business functions. Includes qualitative and quantitative procedures for determining need, selection of sources, storage of materials. Prerequisites: MGT 2360; MTH 2350 or QS 3550. 
         QOM 4230   Quality & Process Improvement Techniques 3 cr.  Study of continuous process improvement, process management, and quality management systems. Includes case studies and group work which explore data analysis tools and methods, including SPC, flowcharting, and root-causes analysis. Students define, analyze, and evaluate a process in a workplace setting, preparing a final report outlining the process and recommending process improvement.Prerequisite:QS3550 
         QS  3550   Applied Business Statistics 3 cr.  Applied study of computerized statistical analyses as they relate to general business operations. Statistical procedures include descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, two-way ANOVA, chi-square, simple correlation. Case study methodology is heavily employed. A computerized data analysis project which uses a minimum of two statistical tests is required. Prerequisites: CIS2380, MTH 2350,and junior standing. 
         QS  4220   Human Resources Selection, Tests, & Measurements 3 cr.  Study of occupational/attitudinal surveying, testing, and evaluation: studies of validity, reliability, internal/external designs, item analysis, factor analysis, quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches. Course work includes measurement and development of instrumentation as applied to business-related issues. Students design and implement an original instrument applicable to either the private or public sector. Prerequisites: MGT 3020, MGT 3100, and QS 3550. 
         QS  4230   Marketing Research 3 cr.  Study of both consumer and industrial marketing research, covering areas of problem definition, survey design, sampling questionnaires, data collection, quantitative and qualitative analysis, graphics design, and report writing/presenting. A high level of analytical expertise is required: students complete an original market research study and offer a formal presentation. Prerequisites: MKT 2550, MKT3680, andQS3550. 
         RST 3100   Franciscan Values, Social Justice & Service 3 cr.  A study of the life and legacy of Francis of Assisi, and its implication for current efforts aimed at building healthy communities. Contemporary dilemmas viewed through the lens of Franciscan thought and tradition (e.g., social justice, universal brotherhood, moral utilization of Earth’s resources, and concern for the needy). Focus upon the contemporary concept of “interrelatedness” and its parallels with Franciscan moral theology. May include an academic service-learning experience. 
         RST 3150   Spirituality 3 cr.  Study of theories of personality and life’s journey as related to the quest for spiritual growth and wholeness. Approaches to Christian understandings of the interrelationship of God and His people and the role of spiritual direction applied to one’s personal and professional experience. Required for Pastoral Ministry majors. 
         RST 3400   Jesus Across the Millennia 3 cr.  A scriptural, historical, and theological investigation into the questions, Who is Jesus? What has His impact been on history and on the lives of persons who proclaim Him Son of God, Messiah, and Savior, et al.? 
         RST 3470   The Sacraments 3 cr.  Survey of the seven sacraments in the Catholic Tradition, with an emphasis on recent developments as they evolved from history, theology, and practice. 
         RST 3490   Christian Worship 3 cr.  An overview of the origins, development, and cultural aspects of Christian worship rooted in symbols, myths, and rituals. Students are assisted in developing various forms of worship services appropriate to their Christian traditions and their ministries. Required for Pastoral Ministry majors. 
         RST 3530   Marriage & the Family (FCS/RST*/SOC) 4 cr.  Marriage and family studied from the Biblical, theological, economic, technological, and sociological aspects. (Interdisciplinary.) Prerequisite: junior or senior status. 
         RST 4080   Moral Issues in Business (PHL/RST*) 3 cr.  Review traditional philosophical theories of ethics; examine principles of Christian morality, particularly those dealing with ethics from a Catholic perspective; investigate areas in the American marketplace that raise ethical concerns (e.g., injustices in the American economic system). 
         RST 4090   Environmental Ethics (PHL/RST*) 3 cr.  A study of moral/ethical dilemmas of equitable and responsible stewardship over creation. Judeo-Christian/Franciscan, non-western perspectives of contemporary issues of war and peace, abundance and want, stewardship and domination, excess and poverty, etc., are explored. 
         RST 4110   Medical Ethics (PHL/RST*) 3 cr.  An academic study of contemporary moral issues relative to modern health care, life science, and future issues in the light of Judeo-Christian convictions. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. 
         RST 4140   Life/Death Issues 4 cr.  An intensive study of the many deaths one must encounter before arriving at the final stage. Practical, theoretical, social, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of life/death situations, culminating in the development of a personal life journal. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. 
         RST 4220   Christian Awareness 3 cr.  A study of the New Testament challenge to wholeness based on the command to love God, self, and others. Contemporary helps and hindrances to that quest examined in the light of ecumenical developments. 
         RST 4280   Church Law 2 cr.  A study of various Christian organizations in the light of policy, rule, traditions, regulations, and procedures as they impact on the work of the Pastoral Minister. Required for Pastoral Ministry majors. 
         RST 4290   Christian Classics 3 cr.  A specialized study of classical and contemporary works by outstanding Christian scholars. Students design and present a concluding work in which the classics are applied to contemporary life. Required for Religious Studies and Pastoral Ministry majors. 
         RST 4720   Church Leadership 3 cr.  The history, theories, practices, and techniques of church-related management; specifically designed for the pastoral minister. Required for Pastoral Ministry and Religious Studies majors. 
         SLS 3010   Advanced American Sign Language I 3 cr.  Advanced American Sign Language development with a focus on English and ASL content and text analysis to increase student vocabulary and understanding of ASL syntactical patterns. Communicative dialogues will emphasize sociocultural aspects of deafness. Prerequisite: SLS 2020 or departmental approval. 
         SLS 3020   Advanced American Sign Language II 3 cr.  Continued advanced ASL development with further emphasis on sociocultural and historical considerations of deaf heritage. Prerequisite: SLS 3010 or departmental approval. 
         SLS 4010   American Sign Languages: Discourse 3 cr.  Ongoing interaction in Sign Language. Students are required to prepare lectures, presentations (informative, descriptive, etc.), and conduct interviews in American Sign Language. Prerequisite: SLS 3020 or departmental approval. 
         SLS 4410    
         SLS 4450   Simultaneous Interpretation for Interpreters 3 cr.  A practical course in the process of interpreting from ASL to English and from English to ASL. Emphasis is on a sociolinguistic model of interpretation. Related linguistic processes are examined. Prerequisites: SLS 4410. 
         SLS 4610   Voice to Sign: Interpreting Lab 3 cr.  Development of skills in voice to Sign interpreting. Audio- and videotaped discourse is interpreted into ASL, and recorded and analyzed with the instructor. Prerequisites: SLS 4410, 3.0 average within SLS department, and/or departmental approval. 
         SLS 4620   Sign Language Structure 4 cr.  Analysis of the symbolic and linguistic structure of American Sign Language and other Sign systems. Includes aspects of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, grammar, and discourse. Examination of bilingual and bicultural practices, sociolinguistics, and related research. Prerequisites: SLS 3010 and/or departmental approval. 
         SLS 4650   Contrastive Text Analysis: ASL & English for Interpreters 3 cr.  Analysis of various texts in ASL and English to identify structures unique to one language or the other. Problems of translation and/or interpretation. Includes discussion of cross-cultural communication between deaf and hearing cultures. Prerequisite: SLS 4620. 
         SLS 4710   Selected Seminar Topics 1 cr.  Workshops or seminars include topics related to Sign Language and interpreting, such as linguistic research, bilingual education, and related issues. (May be repeated for credit as topics vary.) 
         SLS 4750   Interpreting in Specialized Settings 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Emphasis on specialized settings in which interpreters are expected to function. A range of interpreting settings and situations is presented, including: deaf/blind, hospital/medical, religious, and community based situations. Prerequisites: SLS 4610, B average (SLS department) and departmental approval. 
         SLS 4810   Sign to Voice:  Interpreting Lab 3 cr.  Focus on Sign to voice interpreting. Videotapes and in class speakers provide interpreting exercises for the student. Sign to voice techniques discussed and put into practice. Prerequisites: SLS 4410, 3.0 average within SLS department, and/or departmental approval. 
         SM  3100   Facility Design & Event Management (HMG/SM*) 3 cr.  The processes for managing sport and event enterprises. Specific attention given to the design and management of a sport facility as well as the skills and processes associated with administration of a sport event, whether it be participant-centered or spectator-centered. Prerequisite: SM 1100. 
         SM  3300   Sport Marketing (MKT/SM*) 3 cr.  An in-depth analysis of the various techniques and strategies of marketing in the sport environment. Basic marketing concepts examined, with applications to the uniqueness of the sport and leisure industry: event marketing, sponsorship, licensing, sport information, and public relations. Prerequisite: SM 1100. 
         SM  4100   Legal & Ethical Aspects of Sport (BUS/SM*) 3 cr.  An analysis of the legal and ethical aspects of the sport environment. Topics include negligence; liability; control of amateur, professional, and school sport; violence/crowd control; product liability; risk management; and selected current issues. Prerequisites: SM 1100 and BL 3300. 
         SM  4300   Budgeting & Financing of Sport (FIN/SM*) 3 cr.  An analysis of financial concepts and theories and their applications in the professional, intercollegiate, recreational, and commercial sport envrioments. Topics include revenues and expenses of professional, intercollegiate and private sport industries; issues impacting these revenues and expenses; budgeting methods; economic impact; fundraising at the intercollegiate level; ownership in sport and public and private funding for non-profit sport programs. 
         SM  4500   Gender & Race in Sport 3 cr.  Socially constructed categories of class, race, and gender, and their influence on perceptions of the body. The impact these categories have on institutionalization, practice, and representation of sport and leisure is discussed, with an emphasis on promoting unbiased and non-prejudicial sport and leisure environments. Prerequisites: SM 1100 and SM 2300. 
         SOC 3130   Sociology of the Family 3 cr.  Analysis of the family as a major social institution, with consideration of the way forms of the family vary cross-culturally. Examination of how political and economic developments affect the family. Topics include: ethnic and social class variations in structure, patterns of mate selection, parenthood, parent-child interactions, divorce, and changing gender roles. 
         SOC 3250   Women & Violence 2 cr.  An examination of selected types of violence in women’s lives. Analysis of the social factors influencing women’s deviance, victimization, and criminality. Focus on the relationship between gender roles and violence, as well as the most common forms of violent behavior women encounter, such as rape, domestic battery, and prostitution. 
         SOC 3710   Special Topics in Sociology 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 3 cr.)  Analyses of current issues and topics from a sociological perspective. Normally offered in a weekend format. 
         SOC 3800   Sex & Gender Roles 3 cr.  An examination of the idea of socially constructed gender roles and how these roles changed historically in response to internal contradictions, as well as political and economic forces such as the women’s movement. Perspectives included from disciplines such as history, biology, anthropology, psychology, political science, and economics. Discussion of the interaction of race, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation with gender roles with an emphasis on multiculturalism and globalism. 
         SOC 4890   Seminar in Community Leadership 3 cr.  To prepare student for active civic engagement and eventual leadership. Purposeful civic learning through the student’s service learning leadership placement and the creation of a Community Leadership Portfolio. Analysis of the role of civic engagement and community involvement in the maintenance of civil society. This course includes a 30-hour academic service-learning experience. Prerequisites: SOC 1300, SOC 3120, SOC 3420. 
         SOC 4900   Applied Social Research Methods 2 cr.  Application of qualitative and quantitative research method in sociology and related social science disciplines utilizing the scientific method. Students have an opportunity to participate in the completion of a community-based research project and gain the practical experience needed in applied sociology. Major areas of sociological concern include the nature, scope, and logic of social changes. The course includes an exploration of specific strategis to improve society. Prerequisite: SOC 4800. 
         SPA 3010   Business Spanish 3 cr.  Prepares students with an intermediate level of Spanish to use Spanish in professional situations. Special attention to technical and commercial practices that require an advanced command of Spanish (e.g., business communications, public presentations, and cultural etiquette). Opportunity for shadowing in a Spanish-speaking business. In Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 2240. 
         SPA 3110    
         SPA 3200    
         SPA 3220    
         SPA 3230    
         SPA 3310   Oral & Written Composition 4 cr.  Applied advanced grammar, giving practice in original composition with emphasis on developing skill in employing natural, everyday expressions in speaking and writing through the use of correct idiomatic Spanish. In Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 2240. 
         SPA 3570    
         SPA 3580    
         SPA 3600    
         SPA 4800   Study Abroad: Costa Rica 2 cr.   
         SSC 3070   Social Studies Foundations (EDU/SSC*) 3 cr.  Interdisciplinary course comprising selected topics in Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology integrated into an overview of the structure of the respective disciplines and designed to provide solid content background and resources for elementary school teachers. Prerequisites: SOC 1010, and PSC 2510 or GEO 3010 
         SSC 3080   Nature & Scope of Inquiry 3 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)  Theme-based, highly interactive interdisciplinary course designed to enable students to explore the different approaches and ways of knowing that contribute to understanding and resolving complex issues, problems, or dilemmas of contemporary life. Utilizing the different modes of inquiry which characterize the various disciplines, the course involves students in readings, discussions, works of art, lectures by experts, team collaboration, and independent research. The course focuses on a compelling theme and is designed to develop the commitment to intellectual inquiry, humanistic values, and service to others as embodied in the mission of the University. 
         SW  3400   Human Behavior & the Social Environment I 3 cr.  First of two courses examining biological, social, cultural, psychological, spiritual perspectives of human behavior, emphasizing interaction of these dimensions as they impact social functioning within the ecological systems framework. Introduces concepts of context and environment, diversity and difference, oppression, poverty, marginalization and alienation, privilege and power, as they shape human experience and identity. Includes reflection on developmental influences affecting student’s own values, world view, and professional development. Prerequisites: SOC 1010, PSY 1010, BIO 1010 or BIO 2240; prerequisite or co-requisite: SW 2300. 
         SW  3410   Human Behavior & the Social Environment II 3 cr.  Second of two courses examining dimensions of human behavior and the social environment. Builds upon theories and approaches presented in SW 3400: HBSE I, with a focus on human behavior development across the life course and the social system’s role in promoting or deterring health and well-being. Further explores intersection of diversity and difference, social justice and oppression as relates to a person’s life experiences. Stresses positive value of human diversity in social work practice. Prerequisite: SW 3400 with a grade of C (2.0) or better. 
         SW  3700   Practice Methods II: Groups & Families 4 cr.  Second in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Applies knowledge, skills, and values in working with families and groups. Interprets human behavior within the context of a family’s or group’s culture, ethnicity, worldview, strengths, developmental stages, and challenges within a systems theory framework. Develops practice skills and methods for engaging, assessing, intervening, and evaluating with families and groups. Includes a 30-hour academic service-learning experience. Prerequisite: SW 3400 with a grade of C (2.0) or better. 
         SW  4350   Practice Methods III: Organizations 3 cr.  Third in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Analyzes organizational characteristics and behaviors in preparation for advancing effective service delivery. Develops practice skills and methods for engaging, assessing, and intervening in organizations and agencies, including resource development and program evaluation. Focuses on effective, ethical, and professional practice within human service agencies and organizations. Prerequisites: SW 3410, SW 3700, and admission to the Social Work Program. 
         SW  4700   Practice Methods IV: Communities 3 cr.  Fourth in a sequence of four methods courses grounded in the generalist model of social work practice. Examines perspectives and structures of community, focusing on oppression, discrimination, poverty, marginalization, alienation, factors of diversity and difference as well as sources of privilege and power as they impact social well-being. Emphasizes the application of planned change processes at the community level in response to changing contexts and needs to promote social and economic justice, and to advance the equitable distribution of basic human rights and resources. Prerequisite: SW 4350, admission to the Social Work Program. 
         WRT 3440   Advanced Technical Writing 3 cr.  Continued study and application of technical writing principles. Topics include communicating persuasively, designing documents and Web sites, using graphics, evaluating and testing documents and Web sites, and learning key applications for creating a variety of technical documents. Introduction to technical communication software. Students create a variety of technical documents for inclusion in their final e-portfolios. Prerequisite: WRT 2440 or equivalent. 
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