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Undergraduate Admissions Information
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Madonna University
36600 Schoolcraft Road
Livonia, Michigan 48150-1176
(734) 432-5339 or (800) 852-4951, ext. 5339
Fax (734) 432-5424
Email: admissions@madonna.edu

Forensic Science Post-Bac: Cert Achieve | Forensic Science Major: Bach Sci | Forensic Science Major - Support: Bach Sci
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Forensic Science Post-Bac: Cert Achieve    
   Certificate Courses (30 cr. to be chosen)    
      FOR Major Courses (45 cr. to be chosen)    
         BIO 1030   General Biology I 4 cr.  Fundamental biological principles and problems as they apply to molecular, cellular, and organismic levels of the biosphere. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 1110 or equivalent; one year each of high school biology and chemistry highly recommended. 
         BIO 2430   Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3 cr.  Study of anatomical terminology, the cell, and the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: one year each of high school biology and chemistry. 
         BIO 3010   Genetics 4 cr.  Principles of genetic theory that provide a working knowledge of the three divisions of genetics: transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. Topics include cell division, principles of heredity, statistical analysis, microbial genetics, cancer genetics, genetics in metabolism, development and behavior, and genetic engineering. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIO 1030 or BIO 2260; MTH 2350. 
         BIO 4410   Molecular Biology 3 cr.  Introductory course in molecular biology, which includes a comprehensive overview of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome structure and function examined through the lens of molecular biotechnology, with practical application of molecular biology techniques in the laboratory. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 3010, CHM 3610. 
         FOR 1010   Introduction to Forensic Science 4 cr.  Introduction to the theory and application of modern forensic science techniques. Fundamental science concepts applied to crime scene evidence collection and analysis. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: none. 
         FOR 3410   Impression and Trace Evidence Analysis 4 cr.  Theory and practical application of impression and trace evidence analysis in forensic science from crime scene collection to crime laboratory processing. Fundamental science concepts used in the preservation, analysis, and interpretation of impression and trace evidence applied in the course work and through hands-on laboratory experiments. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and CHM 2220. 
         FOR 3420   Firearm and Tool Mark Analysis 4 cr.  Introduction to theory and application of firearm and tool mark analysis in forensic science. Fundamental science concepts used in the preservation, analysis, and interpretation of this evidence applied in the course work through hands-on laboratory experiments. Note: laboratory exercises are limited to disabled firearms using standard operating procedures for safety based on FBI laboratory protocols. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: admission to Forensic Science program. 
         FOR 4520   Forensic Biology (BIO/FOR*) 4 cr.  Theory and application of current biological methods to the practice of forensic science including serological, immunological, and DNA analyses of human biofluids commonly recovered at crime scenes. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program, and BIO 3010 and CHM 3610, or permission of Program Director. 
         FOR 4530   Forensic Chemistry (CHM/FOR*) 4 cr.  Theory and application of current methods in chemistry to the practice of forensic science including spectroscopic and analytical analysis of evidence commonly recovered at crime scenes. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program, or CHM 1110 and permission of Program Director. 
         FOR 3430/4640 Option (3 cr. to be chosen)    
            FOR 3430   Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 4 cr.  Examination of bioanthropological methods to aid in cases of forensic or medicolegal importance. The role of the forensic anthropologist and history of the discipline. Overview of the goals, techniques, and broader applications of forensic anthropology. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and BIO 2430. 
            FOR 4640   Toxicology (BIO/FOR*) 3 cr.  Non-laboratory study of cellular and human pathophysiology as a result of toxic insult. Exploration of toxicants includes analysis of impact of human exposure and disease, as well as the forensic examination of samples for toxicants. Prerequisites: BIO 1030, CHM 2210; BIO 2250 or 2440 recommended. 
         FOR 4650   Ethics and Expert Testimony 3 cr.  Investigative ethics and their implications for forensic science professionals. Overview of the laws governing expert testimony, including on-site case reviews in local courtrooms. The characteristics of an effective expert testimony are exhibited by students in capstone mock testimonies. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours field experience per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and CJ* 3050/FOR 3050. 
         FOR 4950   Senior Seminar 2 cr.  Preparation and presentation of a scientific paper. Taken by Forensic Science students with senior status as a requirement for graduation; to be taken in the final six hours of the program. 
         Electives (3 cr. to be chosen)    
            BIO 2260   Microbiology 4 cr.  Fundamental principles of microbiology with emphasis on the biology of bacteria and other microbes (metabolism, genetics, growth, and death), their ecological relationships in natural and controlled environments, and the interactions of pathogenic microorganisms and their human and animal hosts. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110 or CHM 1610; and, BIO 1030 or BIO 2250 or BIO 2430. 
            CHM 4510   Instrumental Analysis 4 cr.  Theory and techniques of modern instrumental analysis including UV, visible, and IR spectrophotometry; NMR, EPR, and mass spectroscopies; electrochemistry; chromatography including HPLC; other current topics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, CHM 1120, CHM 2210; MTH 1210 or MTH 2510 and MTH 2520; PHY 2530, PHY 2540. 
            CJ  2650   Criminal Law 3 cr.  History, purposes, and philosophy of criminal law, local, state, and federal law; development, application, and rights of the offender. 
            CJ  3210   Principles of Criminology (CJ*/FOR/SOC) 3 cr.  Study of the incidence, type, causes, and theories of adult deviant behavior. Emphasis is placed upon current crime trends and statistics and the processes involved in dealing with crime. 
            FOR 3430   Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 4 cr.  Examination of bioanthropological methods to aid in cases of forensic or medicolegal importance. The role of the forensic anthropologist and history of the discipline. Overview of the goals, techniques, and broader applications of forensic anthropology. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and BIO 2430. 
            BIO 4010   Population Genetics (BIO*/FOR) 3 cr.  Theory and application of population genetics with emphasis on mathematical and statistical methods for describing specific populations, genetic make-up and diversity. 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 3010, MTH 1210, and MTH 2350. 
            FOR 4640   Toxicology (BIO/FOR*) 3 cr.  Non-laboratory study of cellular and human pathophysiology as a result of toxic insult. Exploration of toxicants includes analysis of impact of human exposure and disease, as well as the forensic examination of samples for toxicants. Prerequisites: BIO 1030, CHM 2210; BIO 2250 or 2440 recommended. 
            FOR 4910   Cooperative Education 1 cr.   
            FOR 4920   Cooperative Education 1 cr.   
            FOR 4930   Internship in Forensic Science 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)   
      FOR Support Courses (28 cr. to be chosen)    
         CHM 2220   Organic Chemistry II 4 cr.  More extensive study of reaction mechanisms, aromatics, spectroscopy, and polymerization. Laboratory exercises directed to aromatic substitution reactions, chromatography, and systematic identification of organic functional groups. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110 and CHM 2210; CHM 1120 highly recommended. 
         CHM 3610   Biochemistry I (BIO/CHM*) 4 cr.  Principles of biochemistry; major metabolic and biosynthetic pathways; structure and conformation of biological molecules and their molecular biology. Laboratory exercises in enzyme kinetics, electrophoresis, chromatography, and DNA isolation and manipulation. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, CHM 2210. 
         CJ  3050   Criminal Procedures (CJ*/FOR) 3 cr.  Procedural law for law enforcement officers. Law of arrest, evidence, and search and seizure. 
         MTH 2510   Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 5 cr.  Topics include a study of limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of derivatives, integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: MTH 1210 or departmental approval. Computer Science majors must complete this course with a grade of C (2.0) or better within the first 20 semester hours of their major. 
         MTH 2350   Probability and Statistics 4 cr.  Topics include data collection and graphic presentation; measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; normal and binomial distributions; regression and correlation; sampling methods; design of experiments; probability and simulation; sampling distributions; statistical inference including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for one-sample and two- sample problems; chi-square distribution and test of significance; ANOVA. Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra within the last three years, or placement test, or MTH 1040. 
         PHY 2630   Physics for Scientists and Engineers I 4 cr.  For students planning to major in engineering, pre-medicine, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science. Motion and Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, rigid-body mechanics, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, waves and sound, and thermal physics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 2510. 
         PHY 2640   Physics for Scientists and Engineers II 4 cr.  For students planning to major in engineering, pre-medicine, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science. Electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, geometrical and wave optics, and the essence of modern physics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory three hours weekly. Prerequisites: MTH 2510 and PHY 2630. 
      CHM Minor Courses (20 cr. to be chosen)    
         CHM 1110   General Chemistry I 4 cr.  Principles of chemistry, including atomic structure and periodicity, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws, solution concepts, acid-base theory, redox processes, and equilibrium. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: one year of high school chemistry or CHM 1010 with grade of C (2.0) or better; one year of high school algebra or MTH 1040 with grade of C (2.0) or better. Two years of high school algebra highly recommended, or MTH 1040 and 1050 with grades of C (2.0) or better. 
         CHM 1120   General Chemistry II 4 cr.  Principles of thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium systems, proton transfer, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory projects related to each major subject area. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110 or equivalent; MTH 1050 or equivalent. 
         CHM 2210   Organic Chemistry I 4 cr.  Structure and classification of compounds of carbon, with stress on the aliphatics; IUPAC nomenclature; properties, characteristic reactions of the common functional groups, especially of the oxygen functions; concepts of stereochemistry; introduction to mechanisms; stress on Bronsted and Lewis acid/base processes. Laboratory exercises directed to demonstration of mechanistic processes. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHM 1110 or equivalent; CHM 1120 highly recommended. 
         CHM 2220/3610 Option (4 cr. to be chosen)    
            CHM 2220   Organic Chemistry II 4 cr.  More extensive study of reaction mechanisms, aromatics, spectroscopy, and polymerization. Laboratory exercises directed to aromatic substitution reactions, chromatography, and systematic identification of organic functional groups. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110 and CHM 2210; CHM 1120 highly recommended. 
            CHM 3610   Biochemistry I (BIO/CHM*) 4 cr.  Principles of biochemistry; major metabolic and biosynthetic pathways; structure and conformation of biological molecules and their molecular biology. Laboratory exercises in enzyme kinetics, electrophoresis, chromatography, and DNA isolation and manipulation. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, CHM 2210. 
         CHM 3310   Quantitative Analysis 4 cr.  Theory and techniques of classical quantitative analysis, including acquisition and evaluation of analytical data from gravimetry, titrimetry, potentiometry, and spectrophotometry techniques. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, CHM 1120, CHM 2210, MTH 1210 or equivalent. 
      RST 4110/4140 Option (3 cr. to be chosen)    
         RST 4110   Medical Ethics (PHL/RST*) 3 cr.  An academic study of contemporary moral issues relative to modern health care, life science, and future issues in the light of Judeo-Christian convictions. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. 
         RST 4140   Life/Death Issues 4 cr.  Intensive study of death, bereavement, grief, and mourning. In addition to physical death, topics include alienation, aging, separation, personal violation, and social and phenomenological death. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. 
Forensic Science Major: Bach Sci    
   Major Courses (45 cr. to be chosen)    
      BIO 1030   General Biology I 4 cr.  Fundamental biological principles and problems as they apply to molecular, cellular, and organismic levels of the biosphere. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHM 1110 or equivalent; one year each of high school biology and chemistry highly recommended. 
      BIO 2430   Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3 cr.  Study of anatomical terminology, the cell, and the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: one year each of high school biology and chemistry. 
      BIO 3010   Genetics 4 cr.  Principles of genetic theory that provide a working knowledge of the three divisions of genetics: transmission genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. Topics include cell division, principles of heredity, statistical analysis, microbial genetics, cancer genetics, genetics in metabolism, development and behavior, and genetic engineering. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIO 1030 or BIO 2260; MTH 2350. 
      BIO 4410   Molecular Biology 3 cr.  Introductory course in molecular biology, which includes a comprehensive overview of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome structure and function examined through the lens of molecular biotechnology, with practical application of molecular biology techniques in the laboratory. 2 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 3010, CHM 3610. 
      FOR 1010   Introduction to Forensic Science 4 cr.  Introduction to the theory and application of modern forensic science techniques. Fundamental science concepts applied to crime scene evidence collection and analysis. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: none. 
      FOR 3410   Impression and Trace Evidence Analysis 4 cr.  Theory and practical application of impression and trace evidence analysis in forensic science from crime scene collection to crime laboratory processing. Fundamental science concepts used in the preservation, analysis, and interpretation of impression and trace evidence applied in the course work and through hands-on laboratory experiments. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and CHM 2220. 
      FOR 3420   Firearm and Tool Mark Analysis 4 cr.  Introduction to theory and application of firearm and tool mark analysis in forensic science. Fundamental science concepts used in the preservation, analysis, and interpretation of this evidence applied in the course work through hands-on laboratory experiments. Note: laboratory exercises are limited to disabled firearms using standard operating procedures for safety based on FBI laboratory protocols. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: admission to Forensic Science program. 
      FOR 4520   Forensic Biology (BIO/FOR*) 4 cr.  Theory and application of current biological methods to the practice of forensic science including serological, immunological, and DNA analyses of human biofluids commonly recovered at crime scenes. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program, and BIO 3010 and CHM 3610, or permission of Program Director. 
      FOR 4530   Forensic Chemistry (CHM/FOR*) 4 cr.  Theory and application of current methods in chemistry to the practice of forensic science including spectroscopic and analytical analysis of evidence commonly recovered at crime scenes. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program, or CHM 1110 and permission of Program Director. 
      FOR 3430/4640 Option (3 cr. to be chosen)    
         FOR 3430   Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 4 cr.  Examination of bioanthropological methods to aid in cases of forensic or medicolegal importance. The role of the forensic anthropologist and history of the discipline. Overview of the goals, techniques, and broader applications of forensic anthropology. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and BIO 2430. 
         FOR 4640   Toxicology (BIO/FOR*) 3 cr.  Non-laboratory study of cellular and human pathophysiology as a result of toxic insult. Exploration of toxicants includes analysis of impact of human exposure and disease, as well as the forensic examination of samples for toxicants. Prerequisites: BIO 1030, CHM 2210; BIO 2250 or 2440 recommended. 
      FOR 4650   Ethics and Expert Testimony 3 cr.  Investigative ethics and their implications for forensic science professionals. Overview of the laws governing expert testimony, including on-site case reviews in local courtrooms. The characteristics of an effective expert testimony are exhibited by students in capstone mock testimonies. 2 hours lecture, 3 hours field experience per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and CJ* 3050/FOR 3050. 
      FOR 4950   Senior Seminar 2 cr.  Preparation and presentation of a scientific paper. Taken by Forensic Science students with senior status as a requirement for graduation; to be taken in the final six hours of the program. 
      Electives (3 cr. to be chosen)    
         BIO 2260   Microbiology 4 cr.  Fundamental principles of microbiology with emphasis on the biology of bacteria and other microbes (metabolism, genetics, growth, and death), their ecological relationships in natural and controlled environments, and the interactions of pathogenic microorganisms and their human and animal hosts. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110 or CHM 1610; and, BIO 1030 or BIO 2250 or BIO 2430. 
         CHM 4510   Instrumental Analysis 4 cr.  Theory and techniques of modern instrumental analysis including UV, visible, and IR spectrophotometry; NMR, EPR, and mass spectroscopies; electrochemistry; chromatography including HPLC; other current topics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, CHM 1120, CHM 2210; MTH 1210 or MTH 2510 and MTH 2520; PHY 2530, PHY 2540. 
         CJ  2650   Criminal Law 3 cr.  History, purposes, and philosophy of criminal law, local, state, and federal law; development, application, and rights of the offender. 
         CJ  3210   Principles of Criminology (CJ*/FOR/SOC) 3 cr.  Study of the incidence, type, causes, and theories of adult deviant behavior. Emphasis is placed upon current crime trends and statistics and the processes involved in dealing with crime. 
         FOR 3430   Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 4 cr.  Examination of bioanthropological methods to aid in cases of forensic or medicolegal importance. The role of the forensic anthropologist and history of the discipline. Overview of the goals, techniques, and broader applications of forensic anthropology. 3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: admission to Forensic Science program and BIO 2430. 
         BIO 4010   Population Genetics (BIO*/FOR) 3 cr.  Theory and application of population genetics with emphasis on mathematical and statistical methods for describing specific populations, genetic make-up and diversity. 3 hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 3010, MTH 1210, and MTH 2350. 
         FOR 4640   Toxicology (BIO/FOR*) 3 cr.  Non-laboratory study of cellular and human pathophysiology as a result of toxic insult. Exploration of toxicants includes analysis of impact of human exposure and disease, as well as the forensic examination of samples for toxicants. Prerequisites: BIO 1030, CHM 2210; BIO 2250 or 2440 recommended. 
         FOR 4910   Cooperative Education 1 cr.   
         FOR 4920   Cooperative Education 1 cr.   
         FOR 4930   Internship in Forensic Science 1 cr. (Not To Exceed 4 cr.)   
Forensic Science Major - Support: Bach Sci    
   Support Courses (28 cr. to be chosen)    
      CHM 2220   Organic Chemistry II 4 cr.  More extensive study of reaction mechanisms, aromatics, spectroscopy, and polymerization. Laboratory exercises directed to aromatic substitution reactions, chromatography, and systematic identification of organic functional groups. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110 and CHM 2210; CHM 1120 highly recommended. 
      CHM 3610   Biochemistry I (BIO/CHM*) 4 cr.  Principles of biochemistry; major metabolic and biosynthetic pathways; structure and conformation of biological molecules and their molecular biology. Laboratory exercises in enzyme kinetics, electrophoresis, chromatography, and DNA isolation and manipulation. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHM 1110, CHM 2210. 
      CJ  3050   Criminal Procedures (CJ*/FOR) 3 cr.  Procedural law for law enforcement officers. Law of arrest, evidence, and search and seizure. 
      MTH 2350   Probability and Statistics 4 cr.  Topics include data collection and graphic presentation; measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion; normal and binomial distributions; regression and correlation; sampling methods; design of experiments; probability and simulation; sampling distributions; statistical inference including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for one-sample and two- sample problems; chi-square distribution and test of significance; ANOVA. Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra within the last three years, or placement test, or MTH 1040. 
      MTH 2510   Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 5 cr.  Topics include a study of limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, applications of derivatives, integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: MTH 1210 or departmental approval. Computer Science majors must complete this course with a grade of C (2.0) or better within the first 20 semester hours of their major. 
      PHY 2630   Physics for Scientists and Engineers I 4 cr.  For students planning to major in engineering, pre-medicine, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science. Motion and Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, rigid-body mechanics, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, waves and sound, and thermal physics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite or corequisite: MTH 2510. 
      PHY 2640   Physics for Scientists and Engineers II 4 cr.  For students planning to major in engineering, pre-medicine, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science. Electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, geometrical and wave optics, and the essence of modern physics. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory three hours weekly. Prerequisites: MTH 2510 and PHY 2630. 
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